Major in English Literature (B.A.)
ENL 102Survey of British Literature I4
ENL 202Survey of British Literature II4
ENL 204American Literary Traditions4
ENL 498
ENL 499
Research Seminar in English
and Senior Seminar in Literature
4
Choose one of the following from Shakespeare courses:4
Shakespeare: The Art of the Dramatist
Drama in Great Britain
Choose one of the following from Pre-Modern British Literature courses:4
Chaucer and Writers of Arthurian Quests
Milton and the Seventeenth Century
Enlightenment and Romantic British Literature
Choose two of the following from Modern and Contemporary Literature courses:8
American Civil War Literature
Stories of Refugees and Migrants in America
20th Century Literature
Contemporary Literature
Literature on Location: Major British Authors
Topics in Literary Studies
Major32
General Education49-50
Electives40-41
Total Credits122

Print Version: Excel

Print Version: PDF

B.A. in English Literature 2018-2019: Option 1 - CWILT

First Year
FallCreditsInterimCreditsSpringCredits
ENL 102 Survey of British Literature I4Elective 3GES 130 Christianity Western Culture4
BIB 101 Introduction to the Bible3 Mathematics (M) course 3
GES 125 Introduction to the Creative Arts4 GES 140 Introduction to Wellbeing3
GES 160 Inquiry Seminar3 Second Language (S) course1 4
 14 3 14
Second Year
FallCreditsInterimCreditsSpringCredits
ENL 204 American Literary Traditions4Elective 3ENL 202 Survey of British Literature II4
Laboratory Science (D) course 4 THE 201 Christian Theology3
Contemporary Western Life and Thought (L) course 3 World Cultures (U) course 3
Leisure and Lifetime Sports (Q) course 1 Elective 3
Elective 3 Artistic Experience (A) course 0-3
 15 3 13-16
Third Year
FallCreditsInterimCreditsSpringCredits
ENL 350 (OR ENL 352, ENL 354, or ENL 365)2 , Literature on Location: Major British Authors, or Topics in Literary Studies4Science, Technology and Society (K) course 3ENL 301 (OR Enl 304 or ENL 309 (rotating spring only)) or Enlightenment and Romantic British Literature4
Electives 12 ENL 303 (spring only) Shakespeare: The Art of the Dramatist4
  Electives 7
 16 3 15
Fourth Year
FallCreditsInterimCreditsSpringCredits
ENL 498 Research Seminar in English1Interim Off ENL 311 (OR ENL 317-even springs, or ENL 365-rotating spring even years) , or Topics in Literary Studies4
Comparative Systems (G) course 3 ENL 499 Senior Seminar in Literature3
Interpreting Biblical Themes (J) course 3 Contemporary Christian Issues (P) course 3
Electives 6 Cross Cultural Experience (Z) course 0-3
  Elective 3
 13 0 13-16
Total Credits 122-128

Most financial aid packages stipulate 12 credits/semester; Minnesota state grants are reduced when credit load falls below 15 credits/semester. (Interim credits may be split between fall and spring for state grant only.)

B.A. in English Literature 2018-2019: Option 2 - Humanities

First Year
FallCreditsInterimCreditsSpringCredits
BIB 101 Introduction to the Bible3GES 147 Humanities II: Renaissance and Reformation4GES 140 Introduction to Wellbeing3
ENL 102 Survey of British Literature I4 GES 244 Humanities III: European Enlightenment and American Culture to 18774
GES 145 Humanities I: Greco-Roman through Middle Ages4 Mathematics (M) course 3
Elective 3 Second Language (S) course1 4
 14 4 14
Second Year
FallCreditsInterimCreditsSpringCredits
ENL 204 American Literary Traditions4Elective 3ENL 202 Survey of British Literature II4
GES 246 Humanities IV: Modern and Contemporary Western Culture4 Artistic Experience (A) course 0-3
Laboratory Science (D) course 4 World Cultures (U) course 3
Leisure and Lifetime Sports (Q) course 1 Electives 6
Elective 3  
 16 3 13-16
Third Year
FallCreditsInterimCreditsSpringCredits
ENL 350 (OR ENL 352-fall, even years, ENL 354-fall, odd years, or ENL 365-fall, even years)2 , Literature on Location: Major British Authors, Topics in Literary Studies4Science, Technology and Society (K) course 3ENL 301, 304, or 309 Chaucer and Writers of Arthurian Quests, Milton and the Seventeenth Century, or Enlightenment and Romantic British Literature4
Electives 12 ENL 303 (spring only) Shakespeare: The Art of the Dramatist4
  Electives 7
 16 3 15
Fourth Year
FallCreditsInterimCreditsSpringCredits
ENL 498 Research Seminar in English1Interim Off ENL 311 (OR ENL 317 or ENL 365) or Topics in Literary Studies4
Comparative Systems (G) course 3 ENL 499 Senior Seminar in Literature3
Interpreting Biblical Themes (J) course 3 Contemporary Christian Issues (P) course 3
Electives 6 Cross Cultural Experience (Z) course 0-3
  Elective 3
 13 0 13-16
Total Credits 124-130

 Most financial aid packages stipulate 12 credits/semester; Minnesota state grants are reduced when credit load falls below 15 credits/semester. (Interim credits may be split between fall and spring for state grant only.

ENL 100 • Great Writers: An Introduction to Literature 4 Credits.

Why do great works of literature endure, and how do they illuminate the human experience? Works by classic and contemporary authors are studied for their artistry; their portrayal of great ideas, hopes, joys, and sorrows; and their insight into beauty, truth, and self-understanding.
Offered: Fall, spring.

ENL 102 • Survey of British Literature I 4 Credits.

Major literary works from Anglo-Saxon times through the 18th century, with some attention given to the development of literary movements and genres. Authors include the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, and Pope.
Offered: Fall.

ENL 111 • American Life Stories 3 Credits.

An introduction to American autobiography, exploring how individual Americans write their life stories. Consideration of the translation of some personal narratives into film. Selections reflect the rich cultural diversity of American life.
Offered: Occasionally.

ENL 200 • Juvenile Literature 3 Credits.

An exploration of a wide range of books written for children and teens in grades 5-9, as well as resources for effectively finding, reading, and interacting with them. Major topics of discussion include censorship, diversity, representation, and literacy merit.
Offered: Fall, even # years.

ENL 202 • Survey of British Literature II 4 Credits.

Major writers and works from the Romantic, Victorian, and early 20th century periods. Historical and intellectual background. Writers include Blake, Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, Arnold, Hopkins, Joyce, Conrad, and Yeats.
Prerequisites: GES 160 or GES 244. Offered: Spring.

ENL 204 • American Literary Traditions 4 Credits.

Major American authors studied in their historical and cultural contexts, from the colonial era to the present.
Prerequisites: GES 160 or GES 244. Offered: Fall, spring

ENL 215U • World Literature 3 Credits.

Focused study of literature from a non-western region of the world, examining social and historical contexts.
Prerequisites: GES 130 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Fall, Occasionally interim, Spring.

ENL 235L • Film and the Modern Sensibility 3 Credits.

An exploration of film as an art form and as an expression of the meanings of “modernism.” Why film is a uniquely modern art form is addressed, as well as those themes that identify the “modern sensibility.” Films such as Citizen Kane, Rashomon, Do the Right Thing, Beloved, Tender Mercies, Apocalypse Now, and others are viewed and analyzed.
Prerequisites: GES 130 and GES 160 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Occasionally interim. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in philosophy.

ENL 241L • Modern Mythmakers 3 Credits.

Consideration of how writers and filmmakers appropriate mythic structures and archetypes to create meaningful narratives of human experience. Modern mythmakers may include: J.R.R. Tolkien, George Lucas, Toni Morrison, C.S. Lewis, and others.
Prerequisites: GES 130 and GES 160 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Fall or spring

ENL 301 • Chaucer and Writers of Arthurian Quests 4 Credits.

Major emphasis on The Canterbury Tales and Arthurian literature. Medieval pilgrimage and the Grail quest, as treated by English and continental authors.
Offered: Spring 2020.

ENL 303 • Shakespeare: The Art of the Dramatist 4 Credits.

Major plays in Shakespeare’s distinct periods and genres: history, comedy, tragedy, and romance. Both literary and theatrical aspects are examined, with attention to historical context. Emphasis on performance.
Offered: Spring.

ENL 304 • Milton and the Seventeenth Century 4 Credits.

Major emphasis on Milton’s Paradise Lost and his other poems and prose, with readings in metaphysical and religious poetry of such writers as Donne and Herbert.
Offered: Spring 2019.

ENL 309 • Enlightenment and Romantic British Literature 4 Credits.

British literature from Dryden, Pope, Swift, and Johnson, to Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, and Byron. Emphasis on social and literary satire, prose forms, Romantic nature poetry, the changing role of the imagination, and criticism.
Offered: Spring 2021.

ENL 311 • American Civil War Literature 4 Credits.

Study of the American Civil War and its appeal to historical and literary imaginations. Selected works are studied in historical context, including the causes, the course of the war, and the consequences of the war for the nation.
Offered: Spring, odd # years.

ENL 315G • Literature of the Oppressed 3 Credits.

Literature, film, and stories (testimonies) that reveal truths regarding systems of oppression. Truth-telling explores the struggle for justice through the narratives and the imaginative response of the oppressed. Literary historical foci include the Holocaust, the experience of Native Americans, African Americans, women, and the oppressed in Minnesota.
Prerequisites: GES 130; GES 160; Contemporary Western Life and Thought (L) course; World Cultures (U) course] or [GES 244; World Cultures (U) course]. Offered: Fall or Spring.

ENL 316GZ • Literature of Faith: Christianity and Islam 3 Credits.

Compares important literary works from both the Christian and Islamic worlds from the Middle Ages to the present. Emphasizes literary and historical study, as well as vigorous dialogue and inquiry, as vital tools for understanding present-day Christian and Muslim cultures. A significant cross-cultural experience, involving interaction with Muslim communities, is required.
Prerequisites: [GES 130; GES 160; Contemporary Western Life and Thought (L) course; World Cultures (U) course] or [GES 244; World Cultures (U) course]. Offered: Occasionally

ENL 317 • Stories of Refugees and Migrants in America 4 Credits.

Narrative journalists and writers of fiction humanize the experience of displacement. Around the world, millions driven from their homes by conflict, deprivation or disasters, have sought new homes in the United States. Their stories enlarge our understanding of the human search for identity, opportunity, security and community.

ENL 321 • Drama in Great Britain 4 Credits.

Drama in performance, using the plays seen abroad during the England Term. Special attention paid to Shakespeare.
Offered: England Term, fall, odd # years.

ENL 341K • Environmental Writing 3 Credits.

As the environmental crisis has deepened, American nature writing has evolved into a richly creative endeavor that explores the complex interactions of nature, technology, and society. Students study environmental writing as a means for valuing biodiversity and for envisioning changes in global policies, applications of technology, and environmental ethics.
Prerequisites: Laboratory Science (D) course; mathematics (M) course. Offered: Fall or spring. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in Environmental Studies.

ENL 350 • 20th Century Literature 4 Credits.

Major writers, movements, and themes in early 20th century literature in their historical and intellectual context. Emphasis on the rise of modernism in England, France, and America. Major figures include Eliot, Pound, Joyce, Hemingway, Lawrence, Woolf, Stevens, Williams, and Faulkner.
Offered: Fall, even # years.

ENL 352 • Contemporary Literature 4 Credits.

Major writers, movements, and themes in literature published since World War II. Emphasis on responses to modernism, current trends, and the emergence of minority and women writers, especially in America.
Offered: Fall, odd # years.

ENL 354 • Literature on Location: Major British Authors 4 Credits.

Selected British authors in conjunction with the places that inspired or were the focus of their work. Authors may include Chaucer (Canterbury), Joyce (Dublin), Wordsworth and Coleridge (Lake District), Hardy (Dorset), and Woolf (Bloomsbury).
Offered: England Term, fall, odd # years.

ENL 355 • Modernism in London, Dublin, and Paris 4 Credits.

On-location study of the rise of modernism in literature and art in London, Dublin, and Paris in the early part of the 20th century. Focus on the intellectual and historical context, and on such figures as Eliot, Woolf, Pound, Joyce, Stein, and Hemingway.
Offered: England Term, occasionally.

ENL 365 • Topics in Literary Studies 4 Credits.

Close study in a specific topic or genre of literature. Emphasis on applying the skills of literature study to a closely focused topic.
Prerequisites: ENL 102; ENL 202; ENL 204; or consent of instructor. Offered: Spring, even # years.

ENL 367 • Topics in Literary Studies: Ways of Reading 4 Credits.

Theory offers us deeper way to engage with texts. Students interact with texts through a succession of perspectives and apply concepts and techniques for engaging with literature and culture in more perceptive and satisfying ways.
Offered: Fall, even # years.

ENL 498 • Research Seminar in English 1 Credit.

Research methodology in literature or journalism. Development of a proposal for a scholarly project to be completed and formally presented in ENL 499 or ENW 499.
Prerequisites: Major or minor in English Literature or Journalism; Junior standing. Special Notes: May not be taken concurrently with ENL 499 or ENW 499. Offered: Fall.

ENL 499 • Senior Seminar in Literature 3 Credits.

Analysis of a variety of topics relevant to the practice of literary studies with special consideration given to the role of the Christian reader and writer. Culminates in the completion of a major research project.
Prerequisites: Senior standing; major or minor in English; ENL 498. Offered: Spring

Overview

The Ministry Scholars program is Bethel University's 5-year Bachelor's Degree and Master of Arts in Ministry program that reduces cost and time-to-completion by streamlining undergraduate and graduate education. Graduates receive a Bachelor's degree from Bethel University's College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) and a Master of Arts in Ministry from Bethel Seminary. This program is well suited for a variety of majors who want to become equipped to lead churches, parachurch organizations, and other ministries. It is also a good fit for ministry-minded students who want to pursue bi-vocational ministry or work outside of professional ministry. Students learn from successful ministry leaders and experts in Biblical and Theological Studies, Spiritual and Personal Formation, and Transformational Leadership. This program offers supplemental training resources, cohort-based activities, and mentorship opportunities to prepare ministry-minded students for effective ministry leadership. Students also gain valuable field experience in local churches and ministry settings.

The objectives of the program are that graduates will demonstrate age-appropriate growth and ultimately ministry leadership preparedness in the following domains:

  1. Spiritual life: Students will grow spiritually, deepening their love for, commitment to, and dependence on God, and develop an instinct to trust in God and to connect intimately with God.
  2. Discernment of call: They will clarify and reaffirm their sense of calling to glorify God, to work in Christ’s church and to serve humanity sacrificially.
  3. Emotional maturity: They will become emotionally mature adults, possessing the ability to sense and manage emotions, to see others’ perspectives, to sympathize and empathize, to follow and lead as appropriate and to foster healthy relationships.
  4. Cultural competence: They will become culturally aware, gaining a perspective that all cultures possess strengths and vulnerabilities, an ability to work across cultural lines and an appreciation that diverse teams are stronger teams.
  5. Bible knowledge: They will gain a clear understanding of the Bible’s content and a deep and abiding passion for the truth of the Gospel.
  6. Spiritual wisdom: They will grow in wisdom, possessing a capacity to apply the Bible so that others are inspired by their teaching and preaching to live out biblical truth and experience human flourishing.
  7. Intellectual virtues: They will develop virtues such as critical thinking, respect for data, intellectual humility, and thirst for learning, combined with the skill to interpret and teach the Bible accurately.
  8. Leadership capacity: They will learn to follow leaders and to lead followers—enlisting people, building teams, leading change and achieving results.
  9. Godly character: They will become virtuous people—individuals who love others, speak truth, live humbly, sacrifice their own interests, live justly, express joy and show compassion.

What is Bethel looking for in a Ministry Scholar?

  • Minimum of 3.0 GPA (cumulative college grade point average or unweighted high school GPA if the student has less than one year of college experience), and maintenance of 3.0 minimum GPA throughout the duration of the Ministry Scholars program while enrolled at CAS and Seminary.

  • Able to provide a pastoral or ministry leader reference that speaks to the student’s character and call to ministry.

  • Committed to prioritizing activities and retreats offered for Ministry Scholars, enabling the individual to develop a strong sense of community.

Click here for more information on the Ministry Scholars program at Bethel University