Major in Biokinetics (B.S.)
HAS 120First Aid1
HAS 170Applied Nutrition3
HAS 247Motor Development and Learning3
HAS 250MStatistics and Research Methods in Applied Health Sciences3
HAS 370Functional Human Nutrition3
HAS 375Biomechanics3
HAS 379Integrative Human Physiology3
HAS 393Literature Review in Biokinetics1
HAS 398Physiological Assessment Laboratory1
HAS 399Physiological Assessment3
HAS 445Advanced Laboratory Techniques in Biokinetics3
HAS 450Physiology and Interventions in Disabilities and Chronic Disease3
HAS 481Internship in Human Kinetics and Applied Health Science3
HAS 494Biokinetics Research1
HAS 495Biokinetics Symposium1
BIO 214
BIO 215
Human Anatomy
and Human Anatomy Lab
4
BIO 216
BIO 217
Human Physiology
and Human Physiology Lab
4
CHE 113
CHE 113D
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry I Lab
4
PSY 100Introduction to Psychology3
Major *50
General Education49-50
Emphasis10-12
Electives (4 credits must be at 300 level or above)10-13
Total Credits122

Students must earn a grade of C or better in each course in the major (HAS, BIO, CHE, PHY, PSY). Courses with grades of C- or lower must be repeated.

Exercise Science Emphasis (10 credits)

Select one of the following sequences:4
Human Biology
and Human Biology Lab
Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology
and Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology Lab
Introduction to Organismic Biology
and Introduction to Organismic Biology Lab
HAS 130Personal and Community Health3
HAS 440Advanced Training for Human Performance3
Total Credits10

Human Bioenergetics Emphasis (12 credits)

CHE 214
CHE 215
General Chemistry II
and General Chemistry II Lab
4
Select one of the following sequences: 24
Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology
and Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology Lab
Introduction to Organismic Biology
and Introduction to Organismic Biology Lab 1
Select one of the following sequences:4
Physics of Everyday Life
and Physics of Everyday Life-Lab 1
Introductory Physics I
and Introductory Physics I Lab 1
Total Credits12

Overview

The Ministry Scholars program is Bethel University's 5-year Bachelor's Degree and Master of Arts in Ministry program that reduces cost and time-to-completion by streamlining undergraduate and graduate education. Graduates receive a Bachelor's degree from Bethel University's College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) and a Master of Arts in Ministry from Bethel Seminary. This program is well suited for a variety of majors who want to become equipped to lead churches, parachurch organizations, and other ministries. It is also a good fit for ministry-minded students who want to pursue bi-vocational ministry or work outside of professional ministry. Students learn from successful ministry leaders and experts in Biblical and Theological Studies, Spiritual and Personal Formation, and Transformational Leadership. This program offers supplemental training resources, cohort-based activities, and mentorship opportunities to prepare ministry-minded students for effective ministry leadership. Students also gain valuable field experience in local churches and ministry settings.

The objectives of the program are that graduates will demonstrate age-appropriate growth and ultimately ministry leadership preparedness in the following domains:

  1. Spiritual life: Students will grow spiritually, deepening their love for, commitment to, and dependence on God, and develop an instinct to trust in God and to connect intimately with God.
  2. Discernment of call: They will clarify and reaffirm their sense of calling to glorify God, to work in Christ’s church and to serve humanity sacrificially.
  3. Emotional maturity: They will become emotionally mature adults, possessing the ability to sense and manage emotions, to see others’ perspectives, to sympathize and empathize, to follow and lead as appropriate and to foster healthy relationships.
  4. Cultural competence: They will become culturally aware, gaining a perspective that all cultures possess strengths and vulnerabilities, an ability to work across cultural lines and an appreciation that diverse teams are stronger teams.
  5. Bible knowledge: They will gain a clear understanding of the Bible’s content and a deep and abiding passion for the truth of the Gospel.
  6. Spiritual wisdom: They will grow in wisdom, possessing a capacity to apply the Bible so that others are inspired by their teaching and preaching to live out biblical truth and experience human flourishing.
  7. Intellectual virtues: They will develop virtues such as critical thinking, respect for data, intellectual humility, and thirst for learning, combined with the skill to interpret and teach the Bible accurately.
  8. Leadership capacity: They will learn to follow leaders and to lead followers—enlisting people, building teams, leading change and achieving results.
  9. Godly character: They will become virtuous people—individuals who love others, speak truth, live humbly, sacrifice their own interests, live justly, express joy and show compassion.

What is Bethel looking for in a Ministry Scholar?

  • Minimum of 3.0 GPA (cumulative college grade point average or unweighted high school GPA if the student has less than one year of college experience), and maintenance of 3.0 minimum GPA throughout the duration of the Ministry Scholars program while enrolled at CAS and Seminary.

  • Able to provide a pastoral or ministry leader reference that speaks to the student’s character and call to ministry.

  • Committed to prioritizing activities and retreats offered for Ministry Scholars, enabling the individual to develop a strong sense of community.

Click here for more information on the Ministry Scholars program at Bethel University

HAS 110 • Introduction to Healthcare. 3 Credits.

An introduction to various health professions and the healthcare system in the United States. Emphasis on understanding the healthcare system, current issues in healthcare, and healthcare career paths. Development of healthcare literacy and navigating healthcare culture. Students examine education, training, and licensure and/or certification requirements for potential careers.
Offered: Fall, Spring.

HAS 120 • First Aid. 1 Credit.

Emphasizes the citizen responder as the first link in the emergency medical services system through the American Red Cross First Aid course. Includes CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer.
Offered: Fall, Spring.

HAS 130 • Personal and Community Health. 3 Credits.

Focus on health promotion and the development of skills to make informed lifestyle decisions. Examination of current information on major health issues including exercise, nutrition, stress, tobacco/alcohol/drug use, mental health, sexual health, environmental health, and disease. Emphasis on the importance of becoming an advocate for personal, family, and community health.
Offered: Fall, Spring.

HAS 170 • Applied Nutrition. 3 Credits.

Effects of nutrition on health, human performance and reduction of chronic disease throughout the lifespan. Topics covered also include disordered eating, weight management, supplements, and societal and cultural issues related to nutrition.
Offered: Fall, Interim, Spring.

HAS 200Q • Professional Activities: Individual/Dual. 4 Credits.

Developmental progressions to improve personal skill through instruction, practice, and corrective feedback. Exposure to various teaching methods while participating in individual and dual sports that include badminton, golf, tumbling, tennis, and track and field. Students lacking competency in lifetime activities are encouraged or required (at discretion of the department) to take one or more separate Q courses to meet competency.
Prerequisites: Sophomore class standing or consent of instructor. Offered: Fall, even # years.

HAS 201 • Foundations of Physical Education. 2 Credits.

An examination of the historical, philosophical, sociological, and psychological foundations of physical education from its earliest beginnings through the 20th century. Development of a philosophical base for physical education and study of specific issues, trends, and professional opportunities related to physical education and sport.
Offered: Fall, odd # years.

HAS 205QA • Self-expression through Dance. 2 Credits.

Provides students with opportunities to experience a wide variety of rhythmic movement and dance to enhance creative expression, fitness development, and understanding of, and appreciation for, a variety of dance forms. Students think and move creatively and develop rhythmic skills through participation in aerobic dance, square dance, ethnic dance, and ballroom dance.
Offered: Occasionally.

HAS 210Q • Professional Activities: Team. 3 Credits.

Development of usable progressions and methods for teaching the skills involved in team sports. Emphasis on personal skill practice, with attention to motivation, feedback, and other concepts of motor learning. Sports include flag football, soccer, volleyball, basketball, team handball, and softball. Students lacking in competency in lifetime activities are encouraged (at discretion of the department) to take one or more separate Q courses to meet competency.
Prerequisites: Sophomore class standing or consent of instructor. Offered: Spring.

HAS 215Q • Professional Activities: Conditioning. 2 Credits.

Developmental progressions to improve personal skill through instruction, practice, and corrective feedback. Exposure to various teaching methods while participating in swimming, weight training, and aerobic exercise. Students lacking competency in lifetime activities are encouraged or required (at discretion of the department) to take one or more separate Q courses to meet competency. PR: Sophomore class standing or consent of instructor.
Offered: Fall.

HAS 220A • Educational Rhythms. 3 Credits.

Principles of teaching rhythmic movement, emphasizing aspects of creativity, square dance, social dance, rhythms with equipment, and ethnic dances from various countries. Includes practice and incorporation of skills into multiple teaching situations.
Prerequisites: Sophomore class standing or consent of instructor. Offered: Spring even # years.

HAS 247 • Motor Development and Learning. 3 Credits.

The mechanisms of human motor learning and development with special emphasis on the physical and psychological principles involved in the acquisition and maintenance of motor skills.
Prerequisites: BIO 214/BIO 215. Offered: Fall, Spring.

HAS 250M • Statistics and Research Methods in Applied Health Sciences. 3 Credits.

Descriptive statistics. Discrete probability spaces, random variables, and distributions. Normal distribution, statistical inference, estimation, hypothesis testing, linear regression, correlation analysis, and analysis of variance. Applications to healthcare and Institutional Review Board (TRB) human-based research projects.
Offered: Fall, Spring. Special Notes: Students may not receive credit for both HAS 250M and PSY 230M.

HAS 261 • Theory and Practice of Coaching. 4 Credits.

Theoretical and practical aspects of coaching. Topics include coaching philosophy, game and practice management, drill design, player and coach relationships, and psychological and sociological aspects of sport and/or coaching.
Offered: Spring.

HAS 262 • Coaching of Baseball. 1 Credit.

Advanced skills, strategy, techniques, and coaching philosophy of baseball.
Offered: Spring odd # years. Special Notes: Recommended for students seeking the Coaching minor.

HAS 263 • Coaching of Basketball. 1 Credit.

Advanced skills, strategy, techniques, and coaching philosophy of basketball.
Offered: Fall odd # years. Special Notes: Recommended for students seeking the Coaching minor.

HAS 264 • Coaching of Football. 1 Credit.

Advanced skills, strategy, techniques, and coaching philosophy of football. Basic terminology and position nomenclature for the introduction to coaching football.
Offered: Spring even # years. Special Notes: Recommended for students seeking the Coaching minor.

HAS 265 • Coaching of Hockey. 1 Credit.

Advanced skills, strategy, techniques, and coaching philosophy of hockey.
Offered: Spring even # years. Special Notes: Recommended for students seeking the Coaching minor.

HAS 266 • Coaching of Track and Field. 1 Credit.

Advanced skills, strategy, techniques, and coaching philosophy of track and field.
Offered: Fall even # years. Special Notes: Recommended for students seeking the Coaching minor.

HAS 267 • Coaching of Volleyball. 1 Credit.

Advanced skills, strategy, techniques, and coaching philosophy of volleyball.
Offered: Fall even # years. Special Notes: Recommended for students seeking the Coaching minor.

HAS 268 • Coaching of Fastpitch Softball. 1 Credit.

Advanced skills, strategy, techniques, and coaching philosophy of softball.
Offered: Occasionally. Special Notes: Recommended for students seeking the Coaching minor.

HAS 269 • Coaching of Soccer. 1 Credit.

Fundamental and advanced technical skills for coaching various age levels. Team tactics and concepts of different ability levels as well as development of a personal coaching philosophy.
Offered: Fall even # years. Special Notes: Recommended for students seeking the Coaching minor.

HAS 279 • Introduction to Athletic Training. 2 Credits.

An introduction to athletic training combining didactic and clinical learning experiences. Provides a basic understanding and working knowledge of athletic training room policies and procedures. Students begin completing clinical proficiencies in preparation for the clinical education program. Topics includ; NATA history, professional organizations, injury management, therapeutic modalities, and basic pharmacology.
Prerequisites: Sophomore class standing or consent of instructor. Offered: Fall.

HAS 303KZ • Integrative Medicine in a Cross-Cultural Setting. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the theories and practices of integrative medicine as a means to promote quality health and wellness. Students in this course are exposed to a variety of health models ranging from ancient Mayan practices to modern Western medical practices in order to develop a more holistic approach to health and well-being. Course is taught in Belize, Central America. Scientific theories include ethnobotany, psychoneuroimmunology, integrative nutrition, and biofeedback. Personal practices may include therapeutic touch, yoga, mindfulness, contemplative prayer, nature therapy, and healing effects of physical activity and movement.
Prerequisites: Laboratory Science (D) course; Mathematics (M) course. Offered: Occasionally Interim.

HAS 306 • Administration of Athletics and Physical Education. 2 Credits.

Theories, procedures, and problems involved in the administration of athletic and physical education programs at the interscholastic level and in fitness organizations.
Offered: Fall odd # years.

HAS 314 • Foundations, Administration, and Evaluation of Health Education. 3 Credits.

Introduces the health education and health promotion professions, including historical, philosophical, and theoretical foundations of health education. Explores theories of behavior change, the responsibilities of health educators, and investigates career opportunities. Examines the theoretical and practical basis for planning, implementing, administering, and evaluating health education programs.
Prerequisites: HAS 130. Offered: Spring.

HAS 316 • Curriculum Development in Physical Education. 3 Credits.

Curriculum theory, history, and philosophy. Procedures for translating theory into workable models for physical education, grades K–12, and non-school settings. Writing unit and lesson plans to reflect sequencing of content that differentiates across a range of students' developmental levels.
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. Offered: Spring odd # years.

HAS 318 • Epidemiology. 2 Credits.

Study of distribution of health and disease in populations and its influential or determining factors. Examination of methodological and analytical techniques to summarize health-related indicators in populations. Focus on the tools and epidemiologic methods used to identify, prevent, and control disease and health-related conditions. Review of the epidemiology of many major diseases and health-related conditions.
Prerequisites: HAS 130; BIO 104/104D or BIO 122/122D; BIO 238/239 or both BIO 214/215 and BIO 216/217. Offered: Fall even # years.

HAS 320 • Developmental and Adapted Physical Education. 3 Credits.

Developmental, remedial, and corrective means to meet the needs of special students in grades K-12 and non-school settings. Emphasis on underlying principles of perceptual and motor development, and use of principles in programming for a variety of disabilities.
Offered: Spring odd # years.

HAS 321 • Developmental and Adapted Field Experience. 1 Credit.

Application of ideas from HAS 320 in a 32-hour field experience with hours dispersed between school and community settings.
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. Corequisites: Should be taken concurrently with HAS 320, but may be taken in a different term if necessary. Special Notes: Times and locations are established by the HAS 320 instructor. Offered: Spring odd # years.

HAS 322 • Methods and Materials for Adapted Physical Activity. 2 Credits.

Resources and methodology for teaching a wide variety of activities to individuals with disabilities. Resources include understanding of DAPE literature, family systems, and community services as they relate to the transition process. Methodology includes planning lessons, incorporating assistive devices, and utilizing assessment tools.
Prerequisites: EDU 250 or HAS 320. Offered: Fall, odd # years.

HAS 323 • Developmental and Adapted Physical Education Practicum. 2 Credits.

Practical experience working alongside licensed professionals in the field to deliver services to special education students in their least restrictive and/or integrated environments. Students gain experience planning, leading, and assessing activities relative to IEP goals, and reflecting on their effectiveness.
Prerequisites: EDU 250 or HAS 320. Offered: Fall.

HAS 325 • Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries. 3 Credits.

Techniques for prevention and care of athletic injuries. Practical experience in the athletic training room.
Prerequisites: HAS 120; BIO 214/215 or BIO 238/239. Offered: Spring.

HAS 331 • Organization and Administration of Athletic Training. 3 Credits.

Methods for planning, coordinating, and supervising all administrative components of an athletic training program pertaining to healthcare, financial management, training room management, personnel management, and public relations.
Prerequisites: HAS 325. Offered: Fall.

HAS 332 • Advanced Athletic Training - Lower Extremity. 3 Credits.

Advanced techniques for the evaluation and treatment of athletic injuries to the lower extremity.
Prerequisites: HAS 325; BIO 214/215; BIO 216/217. Special Notes: This course is no longer offered at the undergraduate level. Offered: Fall.

HAS 333 • Advanced Athletic Training - Upper Extremity. 3 Credits.

Advanced techniques for the evaluation and treatment of athletic injuries to the upper extremity.
Prerequisites: HAS 325; BIO 214/215; BIO 216/217. Special Notes: This course is no longer offered at the undergraduate level. Offered: Spring.

HAS 335 • Clinical Experience in Athletic Training I. 1 Credit.

Clinical experiences that provide opportunities to practice, refine, and master previously learned psychomotor and cognitive athletic training competencies.
Prerequisites: Admission to athletic training program; HAS 325. Offered: Fall.

HAS 336 • Clinical Experience in Athletic Training II. 1 Credit.

Clinical experiences that provide opportunities to practice, refine, and master previously learned psychomotor and cognitive athletic training skills.
Prerequisites: HAS 335. Offered: Interim.

HAS 337 • Clinical Experience in Athletic Training III. 1 Credit.

Clinical experiences that provide opportunities to practice, refine, and master previously learned psychomotor and cognitive athletic training competencies.
Prerequisites: HAS 336. Offered: Spring.

HAS 340 • School Health and Drug Issues. 3 Credits.

Examines the roles of teachers and schools in responding to adolescent health problems, with particular attention to health promotion, prevention, and referral, and to the unique role of the school health educator in this process. Topics include alcohol/drug use and abuse, mental health issues, eating disorders, violence, child abuse and neglect, and injuries. Emphasis on the characteristics of effective coordinated school health programs, including the development of comprehensive prevention curriculum.
Offered: Spring.

HAS 345 • Disease and Injury Control. 2 Credits.

Analysis of chronic diseases, infectious diseases, and injuries from both personal and societal perspectives. Focuses on the prevention, identification, and control of diseases and injuries. Examines the relationship of health promotion and lifestyle to disease and injury.
Prerequisites: HAS 120; HAS 130. Offered: Fall odd # years.

HAS 351 • Therapeutic Interventions I. 3 Credits.

Various therapeutic modalities used in the treatment of sport-related injuries. Includes the use of thermal, electrical, light, and acoustical media as modalities for therapy. The physiological effects, clinical applications, and techniques for use are discussed for each modality. Includes practical experience.
Prerequisites: HAS 325 or BIO 214/215. Special Notes: This course is no longer offered at the undergraduate level. Offered: Fall.

HAS 352 • Therapeutic Interventions II. 3 Credits.

Design, implementation, and supervision of rehabilitation programs for sport-related injuries. Topics include reconditioning programs, manual therapy, and functional rehabilitation. Includes laboratory experience in the various techniques used in therapeutic exercise.
Prerequisites: HAS 325 or HAS 375. Special Notes: This course is no longer offered at the undergraduate level. Offered: Spring.

HAS 360 • Advanced Emergency Care. 3 Credits.

A comprehensive course for the healthcare practitioner who must initially evaluate and stabilize a physically active individual in a trauma situation. Teaches rapid assessment, resuscitation, packaging, and transportation of the ill or injured.
Prerequisites: HAS 325 or HAS 120. Offered: Spring.

HAS 370 • Functional Human Nutrition. 3 Credits.

Prepares students in functional nutrition, emphasizing human biochemistry and cellular energetics. Explores the relationship of nutrients to health pathologies, including metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Practical experience with nutritional interventions for health optimization and disease management. Emphasis in biochemical individuality for positive, nutritional modulation in oxidative phosphorylation.
Prerequisites: BIO 122 (or equivalency) or CHE 113 CHE 113D; HAS 170. Offered: Fall, Spring.

HAS 375 • Biomechanics. 3 Credits.

Mechanics of sports performance and anatomical kinesiology. Newtonian mechanics, types of motion, application of force, maintenance of equilibrium, and fluid dynamics.
Prerequisites: BIO 214/215 or BIO 238/239; Mathematics (M) course. PHY 102/102D and HAS 247 recommended. Offered: Fall, Spring.

HAS 376 • Exercise Physiology and Assessment. 3 Credits.

Basic principles of measurement and evaluation, particularly as they relate to physiological training and adaptation in the context of physical education instruction for normal and special populations.
Prerequisites: BIO 238/239. Offered: Fall.

HAS 379 • Integrative Human Physiology. 3 Credits.

Examination of how normal human physiological function (homeostasis) is altered, and subsequently restored, in response to various forms of acute and chronic stress.
Prerequisites: BIO 214/215; BIO 216/217. Offered: Fall, Spring.

HAS 386 • Pathology and Medical Conditioning. 3 Credits.

The study of physiological responses of human growth and development and the progression of injuries, illnesses, and diseases. Included is the recognition, treatment, and appropriate referral for general medical conditions and disabilities of athletes and others involved in physical activity.
Prerequisites: BIO 214/215 and BIO 216/217 or equivalent. Offered: Fall.

HAS 393 • Literature Review in Biokinetics. 1 Credit.

Students develop and work on their research project and IRB. Students will use literature to formulate an independent project. Completion of IRB is expected. Seminar includes discussions of careers, graduate and medical school application and entrance examines.
Corequisites: Concurrent registration in HAS 399. Offered: Spring.

HAS 398 • Physiological Assessment Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory experience accompanying HAS 399.
Prerequisites: HAS 379,( may be concurrently). Corequisites: Concurrent registration in HAS 393 and HAS 399 is required. Offered: Spring.

HAS 399 • Physiological Assessment. 3 Credits.

Applied techniques in the measurement of exercise bioenergetics, neuromuscular performance, cardiorespiratory fitness, and other health components. Particular emphasis is given to the knowledge necessary for exercise testing certifications and development of fitness testing skills.
Prerequisites: HAS 379 (may be taken concurrently). Corequisites: Concurrent registration in HAS 393 and HAS 398 is required. Offered: Spring.

HAS 420 • Athletic Coaching Practicum. 2 Credits.

A practical coaching experience in an off-campus setting, applying knowledge and skill proficiency under dual supervision of a professional coach at Bethel and an on-site professional coach. Designed by the student in consultation with a staff or faculty person.
Prerequisites: Minor in athletic coaching; Senior standing or consent of instructor. Offered: Fall, Interim, Spring.

HAS 436 • Clinical Experience in Athletic Training IV. 1 Credit.

Clinical experiences at an off-campus clinical affiliate site designed to provide athletic training students the opportunity to practice, refine, and master previously learned psychomotor and cognitive athletic training competencies.
Prerequisites: HAS 337; Senior standing. Offered: Fall, Interim, Spring.

HAS 439 • Clinical Experience in Athletic Training V. 3 Credits.

Acquire 320+ hours of athletic training experience working with a Bethel University athletic team for a complete season of competition, under the supervision of an athletic training program preceptor.
Prerequisites: HAS 337. Offered: Fall, Interim, Spring.

HAS 440 • Advanced Training for Human Performance. 3 Credits.

Prepares students to systematically design training and conditioning programs to enhance the function and capacity of the musculoskelital and cardiovascular systems. This courses utilizes periodization and mathematical models with expected physiological and neuromuscular adaptions to maximize human performance in sport, pre-habilitation, public health and special populations.
Prerequisites: BIO 216/217; BIO 238/239; or permission of instructor. Offered: Fall.

HAS 445 • Advanced Laboratory Techniques in Biokinetics. 3 Credits.

Collection, interpretation, and prescription of human subjects data will be conducted. Activities focus on how to work in a dynamic laboratory and refine and master previously learned assessment skills.
Prerequisites: HAS 399. Offered: Fall.

HAS 450 • Physiology and Interventions in Disabilities and Chronic Disease. 3 Credits.

Examination of the physiology of various diseases and how exercise is used as a therapeutic regimen to prevent or often reverse disease pathology. Interactions of lifestyle modification, exercise, and medications are examined. Advanced electrocardiogram (ECG) recognition and testing are addressed.
Prerequisites: HAS 399. Offered: Fall, Spring.

HAS 453 • Therapeutic Interventions III. 3 Credits.

A broad range of therapeutic interventions including pharmacology, psychosocial strategies, and appropriate referral methods are incorporated into this course. Interventions are designed to enhance function by identifying, mediating, and preventing impairments and activity restrictions to maximize participation.
Prerequisites: PSY 100. Offered: Fall.

HAS 478 • Senior Seminar in Athletic Training. 3 Credits.

A capstone course in which students study and implement competencies in professional development and responsibility, as well as evidence-based medicine. Students complete and present an in-depth, evidence-based medicine research project. Aids student preparation for the Board of Certification Exam in Athletic Training.
Prerequisites: Admission to the athletic training education program. Offered: Spring.

HAS 481 • Internship in Human Kinetics and Applied Health Science. 3-4 Credits.

A practical experience in an off-campus setting in applying academic knowledge and professional skills under the dual supervision of a faculty member and a practicing professional. Designed by student in consultation with a faculty member.
Prerequisites: HAS 399 or consent of instructor. Special Notes: Application must be made at least one semester prior to the intended experience. Offered: Fall, Spring.

HAS 494 • Biokinetics Research. 1 Credit.

Students develop and work on their senior research project. Students will complete data collection. Students will continue the discussion on "life after Bethel." In addition, social networking and public speaking and presentations will be explored.
Prerequisites: HAS 393. Offered: Fall.

HAS 495 • Biokinetics Symposium. 1 Credit.

Students prepare and deliver formal presnetation and manuscripts of their research results. Weekly discussions are organized on current research topics. This course will continue the discussion of "life after Bethel." .
Prerequisites: HAS 494. Offered: Spring.