Students who desire a strong liberal arts and science background can pursue engineering in multiple ways. The B.S. in Computer Engineering, B.S.  in Electrical Engineering, and the B.S. in Software Engineering are 4-year programs that can be completed entirely at Bethel University. The B.A./B.S. Dual-Degree Engineering program is typically arranged as 3 years at Bethel University and 2 years at another university with an accredited engineering program. In this program, students earn both a B.A. from Bethel University and an engineering degree from the other institution.

Advanced Placement: The physics department requires a score of 4 or better on the AP exam in order for the exam to be used to fulfill course requirements in the majors it offers. Students with a score of 3 will receive elective credit or receive credit toward General Education requirements. Students should consult the department chair with questions on AP exams and requirements for majors.

B.A./B.S. Dual-Degree Engineering Program

In the dual-degree engineering program, students earn both a B.A. from Bethel University and an engineering degree from an accredited school of engineering. This combination of degrees has proven to be powerfully attractive to prospective employers who seek well-trained engineers with the communication and leadership skills inherent in a B.A. degree. Students benefit from small introductory class sizes and the Christian emphasis at Bethel while obtaining their engineering degree from any widely respected and recognized school of engineering that offers the engineering field of their choice.

Arrangements to complete the Dual-degree Engineering Program can be made with almost any school of engineering on an individual basis, enabling students to go to the school of their choice. A strong working relationship has existed for decades between Bethel University and the University of Minnesota (College of Science and Engineering) in Minneapolis, making it a popular choice for our students. Graduation requirements can normally be met in five years or less of full-time study. The program is typically arranged as three years at Bethel University and two years at the cooperating university, although students may elect to spend more time at either or both institutions.

Program Requirements for a Dual-Degree in Engineering:

  1. All General Education requirements as prescribed in this catalog must be met, except the writing and speaking proficiency courses within the major.
  2. Formal application must be made to the chairperson of the Bethel University Department of Physics and Engineering.
  3. Transfer requirements for the cooperating school of engineering must be met.
  4. All requirements for an engineering degree at a school of engineering must be completed. The bachelor of arts degree in engineering from Bethel University is not awarded until requirements for degrees from both universities have been met.

Many of Bethel's physics and engineering courses are pre-approved engineering courses by various other schools of engineering. A complete listing of such courses approved by the University of Minnesota is available from the Department of Physics and Engineering.

B.S. in Computer Engineering

This major equips graduates with the skill set needed to work in the Computer Engineering field. It is a multi-disciplinary program built upon a combination of key courses in mathematics, computer science, and electrical engineering. The work of Computer Engineers is to research, design, develop, and test computer systems and components such as processors, circuit boards, memory devices, networks, and routers. They update existing computer equipment so it will work with new software, oversee the manufacturing process for computer hardware, and maintain knowledge of computing trends and new technology. They may discover new directions in computer hardware and design non-computer devices that incorporate processors and other computer components and that connect to the internet. 

B.S. Electrical Engineering

The B.S. in Electrical Engineering is designed to graduate outstanding engineers who also have a stronger liberal arts and science background than can be achieved within a traditional engineering program. Our distinctive and innovative approach is based heavily in physics, which is foundational to all engineering disciplines, but uniquely so for electrical. We build on our long tradition of excellence in laboratory-based, hands-on learning. Theory is stressed in the classroom, but plenty of opportunity exists to apply the principles in the laboratory and design setting. Bethel’s Christian liberal arts emphasis helps students develop as whole persons while preparing engineers for either leadership roles in industry or continuing their education in graduate school.

B.S. Software Engineering

This program prepares students for success in a rapidly growing field. The program is based within the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science and is taught by a highly-credentialed faculty with exceptional teaching expertise. Graduates working as software engineers will ensure that overall software systems function well within their intended hardware environments. Because graduates will also have completed Bethel's strong general education program, they can provide clients and/or employers with service that is creative, problem-focused, collegial, and clearly-articulated. A well-developed Christian commitment enables them to work to the highest ethical and performance standards.

Graduate Engineering Program

An increasingly popular option with our students is to major in physics or applied physics and then earn a graduate degree in fields such as biomedical, civil, electrical, mechanical, industrial, or aerospace engineering.

Normally this means 4 years at Bethel followed by 2 years in graduate school. At the end of 6 years, students have both a B.S. from Bethel and an M.S. from the graduate school of your choice. This approach is particularly appealing for those interested in a career that’s more involved with engineering research.

Typically, our students get full financial support during their graduate work through research or teaching assistantships, tuition waivers, or even fellowships. A few have finished their master’s degree in considerably less than 2 years, and some continue on for doctoral degrees in engineering.

Many of our students choose to do graduate work at the nearby University of Minnesota, one of the best engineering schools in the country. Of course, graduate work can be, and is, done at many other fine schools.

ENR 160 • Introduction to Engineering 3 Credits.

Introduction to engineering fields, practicing engineers, engineering work, and the tools that engineers use. Topics such as process and methodology, statistical analysis, and the use of computer software (e.g., CAD) in the development of specifications, design, and prototyping. Emphasis on the ethics and responsibilities of the engineering process.
Offered: Interim.

ENR 260 • Careers in Engineering and Physics Seminar 1 Credit.

Focus on developing careers in high-technology fields such as engineering and physics. Emphasis on exploring some of the wide variety of specific careers possible through methods such as video, lecture, tours, and guest speakers. Development of practical professional skills such as writing resumes and cover letters, accumulating connections and experience, and developing techniques for interviewing.
Prerequisites: PHY 296/297. Offered: Fall. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in physics.

ENR 306 • Digital Logic and Design 3 Credits.

Introduction to digital logic and design. Topics may include Boolean algebra, design and optimization of combinational and sequential logic, the use of programmable logic devices such as FPGA, VHDL or Verilog modeling, and an introduction to processors and memory. Extensive lab experience in the simulation, design, construction and testing of digital circuits.
Prerequisites: PHY 302/303, MAT 125. Corequisites: Concurrent registration in ENR 307 is required. Offered: Spring.

ENR 307 • Digital Logic and Design Lab 1 Credit.

Lab experience accompanying ENR 306 .
Corequisites: Concurrent registration in ENR 306 is required. Offered: Spring.

ENR 308 • Statics and Mechanics of Materials 4 Credits.

Force and moment vectors, equilibrium of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; trusses, friction, centroids, and moments of inertia. Linear elasticity; introduction to stress and strain analysis applied to beams, vessels, pipes, and combined loading; stress and strain; axial, flexural, and torsional deflections for linear elastic materials.
Prerequisites: MAT 223 (may be taken concurrently); PHY 292/292D. Offered: Spring, even # years.

ENR 316 • Analog Circuitry and Design 3 Credits.

Feedback principles and electronic circuit theory and device theory applied to multistage transistor amplifiers. Detailed study of operational amplifiers. Power supply design. Nonlinear circuits. Introduction to filter theory. Introduction to noise analysis and low noise design. Circuit design and construction experience emphasized in projects and the laboratory.
Prerequisites: PHY 302; PHY 303; MAT 222 (may be taken concurrently) Corequisites: Concurrent registration in ENR 317 is required. Offered: Fall, odd # years.

ENR 317 • Analog Circuitry & Design Lab 1 Credit.

Lab experience accompanying ENR 316.
Corequisites: Concurrent registration in ENR 316 is required. Offered: Fall, odd # years.

ENR 318 • Engineering Thermal Science 3 Credits.

Fundamental laws of thermodynamics. Energy transfer modes. The properties, equations of state, processes, and cycles for reversible/irreversible thermodynamic systems. Equations for conservation of mass and energy, plus entropy balances. Application of thermodynamic principles to modern engineering systems.
Offered: Occasionally.

ENR 320 • Mathematical Methods in Physics and Engineering 4 Credits.

Development of skill in mathematical techniques useful in the solution of physics and engineering problems. Included are vector analysis; line and surface integrals; Fourier analysis; partial differential equations; and linear algebra topics such as basis, dimension, matrices, eigenvalues/eigenvectors.
Prerequisites: MAT 222; MAT 223. Offered: Fall. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in physics.

ENR 326 • Circuit Analysis & Simulations 4 Credits.

Circuit analysis techniques as applied to: sinusoidal steady state analysis with power calculations, first and second order transient analysis in both time and Laplace domains, three-phase circuits and magnetically coupled circuits. Additional topics include: frequency response, resonance, filters, Bode plots. Simulation of electrical and electronic circuits will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: PHY 302; PHY 303. Offered: Spring, odd # years.

ENR 336 • Signals and Systems 4 Credits.

Continuous-and discrete-time signals and systems. Topics include: definitions and properties of signals and systems, convolution, solution of differential and difference equations, Laplace and Z transforms, and Fourier analysis. Emphasis is on applications to signal processing, communication and control systems.
Prerequisites: MAT 222, PHY 302; PHY 303, ENR 352; ENR 353. Offered: Fall even # years

ENR 352 • Computer Methods in Physics and Engineering 3 Credits.

Application of the computer to solving applied problems of interest to physicists and engineers. Computer techniques are developed for numerical methods, simulation models, and data acquisition and control in the laboratory.
Prerequisites: MAT 223; PHY 296/297 (grade of C or better) or consent of instructor. Corequisites: Concurrent registration in ENR 353 is required. Offered: Spring. Special Notes: PHY 302/303 is recommended. Carries cross-credit in physics.

ENR 353 • Computer Methods in Physics and Engineering Lab 1 Credit.

Laboratory experience accompanying ENR 352.
Corequisites: Concurrent registration in ENR 352 is required. Offered: Spring. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in physics.

ENR 420 • Software Process 3 Credits.

Balancing the various real-world challenges that a software engineer encounters, including ambiguity, conflicting requirements, task-time estimation, team dynamics, requests from customers, product managers or architects. A team-based software project on a modern computer science topic will be developed during the semester.
Prerequisites: COS 216; ENR 477 recommended. Special Notes: Cross listed with COS 420. Offered: Spring odd # years.

ENR 422 • Fluid Mechanics 3 Credits.

Laws of statics, kinematics, and dynamics applied to fluid mechanics. Integral and differential conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy. Dimensional analysis, viscous pipe flow, boundary layers, separated flows, and potential flow.
Prerequisites: MAT 223; PHY 296/297 (grade of C or better) or consent of instructor. Corequisites: Concurrent registration in ENR 423 is required. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in physics. Offered: Fall.

ENR 423 • Fluid Mechanics Lab 1 Credit.

Laboratory experience accompanying ENR 422.
Corequisites: Concurrent registration in ENR 422 is required. Offered: Fall. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in Physics.

ENR 424 • Materials and Devices 3 Credits.

Theory and application of condensed matter and materials. Physical origin of electrical, optical, mechanical, thermal, and magnetic properties. Particular emphasis on devices such as pn junction diodes, LEDs, solar cells, piezoelectrics, liquid crystals, nanostructures, and sensors. An accompanying lab explores characterization of materials and design, fabrication, and testing of devices.
Prerequisites: PHY 302/303 or PHY 312/313. Corequisites: Concurrent registration in ENR 425 is required. Offered: Fall, even # years. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in physics.

ENR 425 • Materials and Devices Lab 1 Credit.

Laboratory component of ENR 424 .
Corequisites: Concurrent registration in ENR 424 required. Offered: Fall, even # years. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in physics.

ENR 436 • Microprocessors 3 Credits.

Advanced principles of microcomputer hardware and software. Topics include computer organization, instruction sets and addressing modes, assembly language programming, arithmetic and logic operations, input/output, buffers, interrupts and special purpose features such as A/D converters.
Prerequisites: ENR 306; ENR 307. Corequisites: Concurrent registration in ENR 437 is required. Offered: Fall, even # years.

ENR 437 • Microprocessors Lab 1 Credit.

Lab experience accompanying ENR 436.
Corequisites: Concurrent registration in ENR 436 is required. Offered: Fall, even # years.

ENR 446 • Control Systems 3 Credits.

Time and frequency domain representation of feedback control systems. Topics include: stability criteria, root locus methods, frequency response techniques, digital implementation and hardware considerations.
Prerequisites: ENR 336. Corequisites: Concurrent registration in ENR 447 is required. Offered: Spring odd # years

ENR 447 • Control Systems Lab 1 Credit.

Lab experience accompanying ENR 446.
Corequisites: Concurrent registration in ENR 446 is required. Offered: Spring odd # years.

ENR 450 • Topics in Applied Physics and Engineering 3-4 Credits.

Topics selected from various fields of engineering and applied physics for the purpose of illustrating the practical application of physical principles. Emphasis on developing the skills and viewpoints commonly used by engineers and industrial physicists.
Prerequisites: ENR 320 (may be taken concurrently); MAT 222. Offered: Occasionally. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in physics, Course may be repeated when a different topic is emphasized, The field of engineering or applied physics is announced prior to registration.

ENR 465 • Engineering Design Seminar 1 Credit.

Prepares students for engineering practice through a major design experience. Design projects have a major engineering component to them, and are intentionally multi-disciplinary in nature. Students work in teams to design a system to meet a given specification that requires the incorporation of relevant engineering standards.
Prerequisites: Senior standing and a declared major in Electrical Engineering. Offered: Fall.

ENR 477 • Software Engineering 3 Credits.

Formal approach to the design and development of software. Design methodologies include object-oriented design, components, design patterns, and event-driven design. Project management, walkthroughs, documentation, team programming, and the development of a significant software project.
Prerequisites: COS 216. Special Notes: Cross listed with COS 477. Offered: Fall, odd # years.

ENR 490 • Engineering Design Project 3 Credits.

Prepares students for engineering practice through a major design and prototyping experience. The design produced in ENR 465 will be the basis for building a prototype system. The prototype will incorporate relevant engineering standards. Final designs and prototypes are documented in a professional manner and presented publicly.
Prerequisites: ENR 465. Offered: Spring