Major in History (B.A.)
HIS 290Introduction to History3
HIS 499Senior Seminar4
Choose two from American History courses (with at least one at the 300 level):7-8
American Civilization
Christianity in America
Minorities in America
American Constitutional History
History of the American West
History of Women in America
American Beginnings
A New Nation
History of Sexuality in the United States
The American Civil War
Modern America
Topics in American History
Choose two from Global History courses (with at least one at the 300 level):7-8
History of China, Japan, and Korea
History of India and Its Neighbors
Latin American Civilizations
History of Islam
Hispanic Christianity
Revolution and Political Development
Human Rights in International History
Muslim Women in History
African Politics
Modern Middle East
Topics in Global History
Choose two from European History courses (with at least one at the 300 level)7-8
World War I
Near Eastern and Greek Civilizations
Roman Civilization
Medieval Europe
The Reformations
Modern Europe
Topics in European History
Electives from history courses7-11
Major *35-42
General Education49-50
Electives30-38
Total Credits122

Students majoring in history may choose a focus (at least 12 credits) in American, ­European, or global history.

All students planning to pursue graduate study in history should choose a focus. In addition, these students should complete one of the following independent study experiences: one semester or interim spent studying off-campus, HIS 400, or HIS 481. Students planning to pursue graduate-level study in history should also complete study of at least one modern or ancient language through the Intermediate II level and are encouraged to complete a minor in this language.

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B.A. in History 2018-2019: Option 1 - CWILT

First Year
FallCreditsInterimCreditsSpringCredits
GES 130 Christianity Western Culture4Mathematics (M) course 3HIS 290 Introduction to History3
Second Language (S) course1, 2 4 BIB 101 Introduction to the Bible3
GES 140 Introduction to Wellbeing3 GES 125 Introduction to the Creative Arts4
GES 160 Inquiry Seminar3 Laboratory Science (D) course 4
 14 3 14
Second Year
FallCreditsInterimCreditsSpringCredits
History area choice 4Elective 3History area choice 3
Contemporary Western Life and Thought (L) course 4 THE 201 Christian Theology3
Leisure and Lifetime Sports (Q) course 1 World Cultures (U) course 3
Electives 6 Elective 4
  Artistic Experience (A) course 0-3
 15 3 13-16
Third Year
FallCreditsInterimCreditsSpringCredits
History area choices 7Elective 3History area choices 7
Comparative Systems (G) course 3 Interpreting Biblical Themes (J) course 3
Science, Technology, and Society (K) course 3 Electives 6
Cross-Cultural Experience (Z) course 0-3  
 13-16 3 16
Fourth Year
FallCreditsInterimCreditsSpringCredits
History elective 3Interim Off HIS 499 Senior Seminar4
Contemporary Christian Issues (P) course 3 History elective 4
Electives 8 Electives 6
 14 0 14
Total Credits 122-128

Students may choose a focus (at least 12 credits) in American, European (Ancient, Medieval, and Modern) or global history (see catalog for choices).  

Most financial aid packages stipulate 12 credits/semester; Minnesota state grants are reduced when credit load falls below 15 credits/semester. (Interim credits may be split between fall and spring for state grant purposes only.)

B.A. in History 2018-2019: Option 2 - Humanities

First Year
FallCreditsInterimCreditsSpringCredits
GES 145 Humanities I: Greco-Roman through Middle Ages4GES 147 Humanities II: Renaissance and Reformation4HIS 290 Introduction to History3
BIB 101 Introduction to the Bible3 GES 244 Humanities III: European Enlightenment and American Culture to 18774
Second Language (S) course1, 2 4 Laboratory Science (D) course 4
GES 140 Introduction to Wellbeing3 Mathematics (M) course 3
 14 4 14
Second Year
FallCreditsInterimCreditsSpringCredits
History area choice 4History area choice 3History area choice 3
GES 246 Humanities IV: Modern and Contemporary Western Culture4 World Cultures (U) course 3
Electives 7 Leisure and Lifetime Sports (Q) course 1
  Electives 6
  Artistic Experience (A) course 0-3
 15 3 13-16
Third Year
FallCreditsInterimCreditsSpringCredits
History area choices 7Elective 3History area choice 4
Comparative Systems (G) course 3 Interpreting Biblical Themes (J) course 3
Science, Technology, and Society (K) course 3 Electives 8
Cross-Cultural Experience (Z) course 0-3  
 13-16 3 15
Fourth Year
FallCreditsInterimCreditsSpringCredits
History elective 3Interim Off HIS 499 Senior Seminar4
Contemporary Christian Issues (P) course 3 History elective 4
Electives 8 Electives 6
 14 0 14
Total Credits 122-128

Students may choose a focus (at least 12 credits) in American, European (Ancient, Medieval, and Modern) or global history (see catalog for choices).  

Most financial aid packages stipulate 12 credits/semester; Minnesota state grants are reduced when credit load falls below 15 credits/semester. (Interim credits may be split between fall and spring for state grant purposes only.)

HIS 200L • American Civilization. 3 Credits.

An exploration ofAmerican history from early Native American communities to the present. Examination of major social, cultural, economic, political, and religious change over time in the American experience.
Prerequisites: GES 130 and GES 160 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Fall, spring

HIS 204U • African Civilizations. 3 Credits.

The peoples and cultures of Africa. African social structures, religions, government, warfare, technology, and the arts. Traditional African societies, the impact of Western colonialism, the rise of nationalism, and contemporary issues.
Prerequisites: GES 130 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Occasionally

HIS 205U • History of China, Japan, and Korea. 3 Credits.

History and cultures of East Asia. Religion; economic development and trade; and family, social, and political organization. Primary focus on China, Korea, and Japan.
Prerequisites: GES 130 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Spring

HIS 206U • History of India and Its Neighbors. 3 Credits.

History of cultures and societies of South Asia. Religion; economic development and trade; and family, social, and political organization of India and its neighbors.
Prerequisites: GES 130 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Occasionally

HIS 207U • Latin American Civilizations. 3 Credits.

History of cultures and societies of Latin America. Social, religious, geographic, economic, and political history. The Americas before European contact (with emphasis on Mexico and Central and South America), impact of European conquest and colonization, struggles for independence and national and regional identity, relations with the United States, and Latin America’s place in the global economy.
Prerequisites: GES 130 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Spring

HIS 209L • Christianity in America. 3 Credits.

Christianity as a vital factor in North American history and life. Develops an understanding of the European Reformations, the Enlightenment, and other modern developments as factors interacting with Christianity in various aspects of North American culture from colonial times to the present. Exploration of Christian responses to issues such as democracy, imperialism, slavery, secularism, industrialization, materialism, communism, civil rights, pluralism, war, globalization, and technology.
Prerequisites: GES 130 and GES 160 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Occasionally

HIS 210U • Minorities in America. 3 Credits.

History of multicultural America from the colonial period to the present through a case approach. Focuses on one of the following cultures: Native American, African American, Asian, Hispanic, Jewish American, or Muslim. Examination of themes such as family, society, arts, education, work, slavery, discrimination, immigration-assimilation, democracy, social justice, the role of religion, and women’s concerns as they are experienced by various minority groups.
Prerequisites: GES 130 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Fall, odd # years

HIS 212U • History of Islam. 3 Credits.

Introduces the religion of Islam from its inception and development to Islam as it is practiced worldwide today. Students interact with members of the Islamic community in Minnesota in an attempt to understand Islam from the personal experiences of Muslims. Contemporary issues and controversies are examined through the lens of the Muslim experience throughout history.
Prerequisites: GES 130 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Spring. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in religious studies.

HIS 216L • American Constitutional History. 3 Credits.

Examination of the origins and development of American constitutional ideas and institutions from the colonial period to the present. Particular attention paid to the historical connections between major constitutional cases and broader social, political, economic, and cultural trends.
Prerequisites: GES 130 and GES 160 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Spring. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in political science.

HIS 217UZ • Hispanic Christianity. 3 Credits.

Hispanic Christianity in Latin America and the United States with focus from the 19th century to date. Colonialism to modernity and new nations; Protestantism from mainlines to grassroots movements; responses to issues such as civil rights, liberation, race, gender, immigration, poverty, and education; diversity of Hispanic theologies, missions, and ministries. Includes significant personal intercultural engagement and service learning with an assigned local Hispanic church or faith-based community service organization.
Prerequisites: GES 130 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Fall, even # years. Special Notes: Spanish language not a requirement.

HIS 221L • Making of Minnesota. 3 Credits.

Examination of the historical development of Minnesota up to the present with a social and economic focus: immigration, use and abuse of natural resources, populist politics, intergroup relations, and Minnesota’s impact on the nation.
Prerequisites: GES 130 and GES 160 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered:Occasionally

HIS 223L • History of the American West. 3 Credits.

An examination of the history of the American West from 1492 to the present. Particular attention to the interaction and competition of different cultures; the construction of political, economic, and religious institutions; and the physical environment, its representations, and its symbolic importance in the broader context of American history.
Prerequisites: GES 130 and GES 160 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Interim, odd # years

HIS 230L • World War I. 3 Credits.

An experiential study of the history of the First World War built around travel in England, Belgium, France, and Germany, including visits to battlefield sites, cemeteries, memorials, and museums. Students will learn what it was like to experience and remember total war and to appreciate this particular conflict’s larger significance for American and European culture.
Prerequisites: GES 130 and GES 160 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Interim, odd # years

HIS 231L • World War II. 3 Credits.

The causes, course, conclusion, and legacy of World War II, particularly as experienced by the people of China, France, Germany, Great Britain, Japan, Russia, and the United States. Key topics include collaboration and resistance, genocide, the war in film, remembrance and forgetting, and the social and economic impacts of the war.
Prerequisites: GES 130; GES 160 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Spring

HIS 241L • Revolution and Political Development. 3 Credits.

Theory and process of modernization, with special emphasis on the Anglo-American historical experience; examinations of U.S. efforts to promote democracy internationally in Europe, Asia, and the Middle East since World War II.
Prerequisites: GES 130 and GES 160 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Interim. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in political science.

HIS 245L • History of Women in America. 3 Credits.

Discussion of “What does it mean to be an American woman?” Historical experiences of American women cutting across race, class, and ethnicity are used to examine gender, citizenship, and the meaning of political, social, and cultural history for women and men.
Prerequisites: GES 130 and GES 160 (may be taken concurrently) or GES 244 (may be taken concurrently). Offered: Fall

HIS 290 • Introduction to History. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the methodology and philosophy of history, with particular emphases on preparing students for historical research and writing, on the public uses of history, and on the discipline as a Christian vocation.
Offered: Spring.

HIS 300 • American Beginnings. 4 Credits.

An exploration of early American history from Native-American communities through the American Revolution. Investigation of the origins and character of American beginnings through the interactions of Native Americans, African Americans, and Euro-Americans. Topics covered include: Native-American responses to European invasion, colonial expansion, slavery, family structure, early industrialism, and the formation of the Constitution.
Prerequisites: HIS 200L or sophomore standing. Offered: Fall 2020.

HIS 301 • A New Nation. 4 Credits.

An exploration of 19th century American history from 1790 to 1890. Examination of major social, economic, cultural, political, and religious change in 19th century America, with an emphasis on the intersections of race, class, and gender.
Prerequisites: HIS 200L or sophomore standing. Offered: Fall.

HIS 302 • History of Sexuality in the United States. 4 Credits.

An examination of the history of sexuality from the colonial period to the present. Particular attention to the impact of religion, culture, government, science, and economics on the formation of sexual mores and identities, and the relationship between sexuality and gender, race, ethnicity, age, and class.
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. Offered: Spring, even # years

HIS 305G • The Cold War. 3 Credits.

The Cold War as an event in international history, studied from the perspective of the United States, the Soviet Union, China, Europe, and the Third World. Introduces students to ongoing historical debates and to the sources historians use in those debates (including declassified documents available online).
Prerequisites: [GES 130; GES 160; Contemporary Western Life and Thought (L) course; World Cultures (U) course] or [GES 244; World Cultures (U) course]. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in political science. Offered: Fall, even # years.

HIS 307 • The American Civil War. 4 Credits.

A history of the American Civil War: causes, course of the war, and short- and long-term consequences. Includes, but is not limited to: examining political, military, social, cultural, economic, religious, and environmental events of the American Civil War.
Prerequisites: HIS 200L or sophomore standing. Offered: Spring, odd # years

HIS 310 • Near Eastern and Greek Civilizations. 4 Credits.

Roots of Western civilization in the Near East and Greece. World of the Mesopotamian Empire; Egypt of the pharaohs; and Greece of Homer, Socrates, and Alexander. Cultural and historical context for understanding biblical literature.
Prerequisites: GES 130 or GES 145; sophomore standing. Offered: Occasionally

HIS 311 • Roman Civilization. 4 Credits.

Development of the Romans from their origins through their achievement of a world empire to the conversion of the Emperor Constantine. Politics, government, literature, art, philosophy, and religion as well as the emergence and growth of the Christian church. Continuing heritage of Rome in our contemporary world.
Prerequisites: GES 130 or GES 145; sophomore standing. Offered: Spring

HIS 312 • Medieval Europe. 4 Credits.

Historical developments in Western Europe from the reign of Constantine to the era of Petrarch (A.D. 325-1350). Broad cultural, economic, political, social, and religious patterns, with emphasis on the development of the church in its social context.
Prerequisites: GES 130 or GES 145; sophomore standing. Offered: Occasionally

HIS 320K • History and the Human Environment. 3 Credits.

Environmental and geographical background of human history. Agriculture, climate, energy resources, transportation, and diseases, especially as they have influenced the historical development of Western Europe and North America. Implications for current and future environmental concerns.
Prerequisites: Laboratory Science (D) course; Mathematics (M) course. Offered: Fall, spring. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in geography.

HIS 324G • Human Rights in International History. 3 Credits.

International and comparative exploration of how human rights have been defined, violated, and protected. Discussion of historical topics (e.g., the abolition of the slave trade, social reform and Christian missions, the genocides of the 20th century), as well as contemporary issues. May include a service-learning project completed at Bethel or with a local organization.
Prerequisites: [GES 130; GES 160; Contemporary Western Life and Thought (L) course; World Cultures (U) course] or [GES 244; World Cultures (U) course]. Offered: Occasionally. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in political science.

HIS 328G • Muslim Women in History. 3 Credits.

Global survey of the lives of Muslim women from the 7th century to the present. Examination of how Muslim women’s lives have historically been shaped by their social context, with particular attention to religious interpretation and expression, culture, ethnicity, and geographic location.
Prerequisites: [GES 130; GES 160; Contemporary Western Life and Thought (L) course; World Cultures (U) course] or [GES 244; World Cultures (U) course]. Offered: Interim. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in religious studies.

HIS 329 • African Politics. 3 Credits.

Consideration of political development in Africa from the pre-colonial era through the present, focusing on changes in political regimes through time, the nature of economic struggles, and sources of violent conflict. Specific case studies and shared African experiences and challenges will be examined.
Prerequisites: POS 202U or POS 205 recommended. Offered: Spring. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in political science.

HIS 335G • The Reformations. 3 Credits.

Christian worldviews in the 16th century, including the Protestant Reformation, Catholic Reformation, and Radical Reformation.
Prerequisites: [GES 130; GES 160; Contemporary Western Life and Thought (L) course; World Cultures (U) course] or [GES 244; World Cultures (U) course]. Offered: Fall, even # years

HIS 350 • Modern America. 4 Credits.

An exploration of 20th century American history from 1890 to the present. Examination of major social, economic, cultural, political, and religious change in modern America, with an emphasis on the intersections of race, class, and gender.
Prerequisites: HIS 200L; Sophomore standing. Offered: Fall 2019.

HIS 354 • Modern Europe. 4 Credits.

The social, political, diplomatic, intellectual, and religious history of Europe since 1750. Key themes include political reforms and revolutions, gender roles, industrialization, migration, nationalism, imperialism, total war, totalitarianism, genocide, decolonization, and secularization.
Prerequisites: GES 130 or GES 246; Sophomore standing. Offered: Fall, odd # years.

HIS 356 • Modern Middle East. 4 Credits.

Political, social, religious, economic, and cultural history of the Middle East since 1800. Particular attention is paid to colonialism, globalization, war, gender roles revolution, and reform. Controversies such as the Arab/Israeli conflict, the Islamic Revolution in Iran, Saddam Hussein’s Iraq, and the U.S. war on terror are discussed.
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. Offered: Fall. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in political science.

HIS 360 • Classics in Western Political Philosophy. 4 Credits.

Selected political theorists. Such writers as Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Luther, Calvin, Locke, Marx, and Niebuhr. Concentrates on primary sources.
Prerequisites: One course in political science, philosophy, or European history. Offered: Spring, even # years. Special Notes: Carries cross-credit in philosophy and political science.

HIS 370 • Topics in American History. 3-4 Credits.

Selected topics in American history. Specific topic to be announced in advance of registration.
Prerequisites: HIS 200L or consent of instructor. Repeatable course: The course may be repeated when a different topic is emphasized. Offered: Occasionally

HIS 371 • Topics in European History. 3-4 Credits.

Selected areas, themes, and periods of European history. Specific topic is announced in advance of registration.
Prerequisites: GES 130 or GES 246; Contemporary Western Life and Thought (L) course. Repeatable course: The course may be repeated when a different topic is emphasized. Offered: Occasionally

HIS 372 • Topics in Global History. 3 Credits.

Selected themes, periods, and areas, focusing on Asia, Africa, or Latin America. Specific topic to be announced in advance of registration.
Prerequisites: GES 130 or GES 246; Contemporary Western Life and Thought (L) course or GES 246; World Cultures (U) course. Repeatable course: May be repeated when a different topic is emphasized. Offered: Occasionally

HIS 400 • Research in History. 3 Credits.

An opportunity to work with a member of the history faculty on a major research project.
Prerequisites: Major in history; coursework appropriate to the area of research; invitation of supervising faculty member; consent of department. Offered: Occasionally. Special Notes: No student may take more than six credits in HIS 400 and/or directed study.

HIS 481 • Internship in History. 1-4 Credits.

A practical experience in applying academic skills in an off-campus setting under the dual supervision of a history faculty member and a practicing historian or related professional. Designed by student in consultation with history department faculty.
Prerequisites: Major in history. Offered: Occasionally

HIS 499 • Senior Seminar. 4 Credits.

Historiography, historical methodology, and the philosophy of history. Emphasis on synthesis, integration, and writing of a research paper.
Prerequisites: Senior standing and HIS 290 (or consent of instructor). Offered: Spring

Overview

The Ministry Scholars program is Bethel University's 5-year Bachelor's Degree and Master of Arts in Ministry program that reduces cost and time-to-completion by streamlining undergraduate and graduate education. Graduates receive a Bachelor's degree from Bethel University's College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) and a Master of Arts in Ministry from Bethel Seminary. This program is well suited for a variety of majors who want to become equipped to lead churches, parachurch organizations, and other ministries. It is also a good fit for ministry-minded students who want to pursue bi-vocational ministry or work outside of professional ministry. Students learn from successful ministry leaders and experts in Biblical and Theological Studies, Spiritual and Personal Formation, and Transformational Leadership. This program offers supplemental training resources, cohort-based activities, and mentorship opportunities to prepare ministry-minded students for effective ministry leadership. Students also gain valuable field experience in local churches and ministry settings.

The objectives of the program are that graduates will demonstrate age-appropriate growth and ultimately ministry leadership preparedness in the following domains:

  1. Spiritual life: Students will grow spiritually, deepening their love for, commitment to, and dependence on God, and develop an instinct to trust in God and to connect intimately with God.
  2. Discernment of call: They will clarify and reaffirm their sense of calling to glorify God, to work in Christ’s church and to serve humanity sacrificially.
  3. Emotional maturity: They will become emotionally mature adults, possessing the ability to sense and manage emotions, to see others’ perspectives, to sympathize and empathize, to follow and lead as appropriate and to foster healthy relationships.
  4. Cultural competence: They will become culturally aware, gaining a perspective that all cultures possess strengths and vulnerabilities, an ability to work across cultural lines and an appreciation that diverse teams are stronger teams.
  5. Bible knowledge: They will gain a clear understanding of the Bible’s content and a deep and abiding passion for the truth of the Gospel.
  6. Spiritual wisdom: They will grow in wisdom, possessing a capacity to apply the Bible so that others are inspired by their teaching and preaching to live out biblical truth and experience human flourishing.
  7. Intellectual virtues: They will develop virtues such as critical thinking, respect for data, intellectual humility, and thirst for learning, combined with the skill to interpret and teach the Bible accurately.
  8. Leadership capacity: They will learn to follow leaders and to lead followers—enlisting people, building teams, leading change and achieving results.
  9. Godly character: They will become virtuous people—individuals who love others, speak truth, live humbly, sacrifice their own interests, live justly, express joy and show compassion.

What is Bethel looking for in a Ministry Scholar?

  • Minimum of 3.0 GPA (cumulative college grade point average or unweighted high school GPA if the student has less than one year of college experience), and maintenance of 3.0 minimum GPA throughout the duration of the Ministry Scholars program while enrolled at CAS and Seminary.

  • Able to provide a pastoral or ministry leader reference that speaks to the student’s character and call to ministry.

  • Committed to prioritizing activities and retreats offered for Ministry Scholars, enabling the individual to develop a strong sense of community.