Study in New Testament is the disciplined exploration of God’s revelation to the church using tools such as Greek language, historical background, and cultural insight. Interacting with the New Testament creates the knowledge base that a believer uses when building a comprehensive Christian worldview.

Objectives for students

  • Develop skills of disciplined Bible study, including reading the New Testament;
  • Understand the historical contexts of the New Testament and its books;
  • Understand major themes of the Bible written by the church;
  • Understand how the wisdom of the New Testament shapes Christian living and ministry; and
  • Find inspiration and clear direction for passionate devotion to Christ and transformational service to His church and to the world.

Basic Studies

BT 508 • The Bible and the Interpreter. 1.5 Credits.

An introduction to the relationship of writer, text, and reader in the interpretation process (philosophical hermeneutics) and to methods for studying the Bible (exegesis). Students will gain skills for interpreting various literary genres of Scripture.
Campus: San Diego. Special Notes: Enrollment limited to M.A.M.F.T and M.A.M.H.C students.

BT 510 • Hermeneutics. 3 Credits.

An introduction to biblical interpretation. The course will survey the relationship of author, text, and reader in the interpretative process with the goal of determining the nature and context of divine revelation. Students will gain practical skill in interpreting the primary literary genres of Scripture.
Special Notes: This course should be taken as soon as possible after entering seminary and is a prerequisite for all advanced courses in biblical studies.

BT 655 • Integrative Hermeneutics. 3 Credits.

An in-depth look at the human experience of interpretation, through the grid of philosophical hermeneutics and its intersections to theology.
Prerequisites: BT 510 Special Notes: Crosslisted with PH 655.

NT 508 • Introduction to the New Testament: Scripture and Story. 1.5 Credits.

A study of New Testament books, focusing on themes, theology, and interpretive methodologies, coupled with consideration of role of the interpreter.
Campus: San Diego. Special Notes: Enrollment limited to M.A.M.F.T. and M.A.M.H.C students.

NT 541 • Greek I: Beginning Greek. 3 Credits.

Introduction to biblical interpretation using NT Greek. Translation of Greek texts containing common New Testament Greek words and basic grammatical forms and syntax. Identification of the forms and basic grammatical/syntactical functions of nouns, adjectives and pronouns and the indicative mood of verbs. Definition of common New Testament Greek words.

NT 542 • Greek II: Intermediate Greek. 3 Credits.

A review and expansion of morphology, a survey of syntax, vocabulary building, and translation with a goal toward developing an exegetical methodology. The course will also include an introduction to textual criticism.
Prerequisites: NT 541 or passing of Greek Qualifying Exam.

Introduction to Exegesis

NT 516 • New Testament Survey: Narratives, Letters, and Revelation. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the New Testament, focused on the genre of NT books, their first century historical and literary contexts, and their theological purposes, with the goal of recontextualizing their messages in minstry contexts today.
Prerequisites: BT 510 (may be concurrent).

NT 518 • New Testament: Exegetical Explorations. 3 Credits.

A focused study of selected NT writings to develop further the exegetical skills of genre analysis, contextual study, and theological reflection and engagement.
Prerequisites: BT 510 and NT 516.

NT 652 • Greek Exegesis. 1.5 Credits.

Exegesis of select texts from the Greek New Testament. Translation and syntactical work will be the backbone of the course, with a goal toward the preparation to teach or preach the text. Attention will also be provided to text-critical, lexical and grammatical issues.
Prerequisites: NT 542.

Advanced Studies

NT 601 • Matthew. 3 Credits.

A concentrated study in the interpretation of the book of Matthew. The meaning of the author will be examined, as well as various critical questions relating to the study of the Gospels.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 602 • Mark. 3 Credits.

A concentrated study in the interpretation of the book of Mark. The meaning of the author will be examined, as well as various critical questions relating to the study of the Gospels.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 603 • Luke. 3 Credits.

A concentrated study in the interpretation of the book of Luke. The meaning of the author will be examined, as well as various critical questions relating to the study of the Gospels.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 604 • John. 3 Credits.

A concentrated study in the interpretation of the book of John. The meaning of the author will be examined, as well as various critical questions relating to the study of the Gospels.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 606 • Romans. 1.5,3 Credits.

An in-depth analysis of the book of Romans. The central theological themes of the letter will be explored, and there will also be an examination of introductory questions and the relevance of the letter for today's world.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 607 • 1 Corinthians. 3 Credits.

An in-depth analysis of 1 Corinthians. The central theological themes of the letter will be explored, and there will also be an examination of introductory questions and the relevance of the letter for today's world.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 609 • Galatians. 3 Credits.

An in-depth analysis of the book of Galatians. The central theological themes of the letter will be explored, and there will also be an examination of introductory questions and the relevance of the letter for today's world.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 610 • Ephesians. 3 Credits.

An in-depth analysis of the book of Ephesians. The central theological themes of the letter will be explored, and there will also be an examination of introductory questions and the relevance of the letter for today's world.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 611 • Philippians. 1.5,3 Credits.

An in-depth analysis of the book of Philippians. The central theological themes of the letter will be explored, and there will also be an examination of introductory questions and the relevance of the letter for today's world.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 613 • 1 and 2 Thessalonians. 3 Credits.

An in-depth analysis of 1 and 2 Thessalonians. The central theological themes of the letter will be explored, and there will also be an examination of introductory questions and the relevance of the letter for today's world.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 615 • Hebrews. 3 Credits.

An exegetical study of the book of Hebrews. Attention is devoted to introductory issues, the meaning of the book, its theological contribution, and the message for the contemporary church.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 616 • James and Petrine Letters. 3 Credits.

An exegetical study of the book of James and Petrine Letters. Attention is devoted to introductory issues, the meaning of the book, its theological contribution, and the message for the contemporary church.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 640 • Greek Bible Readings. 3 Credits.

Involves translating various selections from the Septuagint, New Testament, and early Christian literature.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 662 • Advanced Greek Grammar. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the science of linguistics; a study of clauses and other large elements in the sentence; a survey of grammatical terms; the use of grammars, lexicons, concordances, and other tools for exegesis; and translation of selected passages from some of the more difficult books of the New Testament.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 702 • The Parables of Jesus. 3 Credits.

The meaning, authenticity, and theology of the parables, as well as the principles and praxis of interpreting parables, are studied.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 705 • New Testament Background. 3 Credits.

A study of the Jewish and Greco-Roman historical, religious, and literary background of the New Testament. Emphasis is placed on primary source material.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 709 • The Historical Jesus. 3 Credits.

This course is a study of the origin and development of the three quests for the historical Jesus. The critical methodologies of each quest will be studied, along with the various portraits of Jesus proposed by the scholars of these quests. The context for the course is the worshipping community as it encounters Jesus and the renewal of worship that flows from meeting Him.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 716 • New Testament Models of Spiritual Formation. 3 Credits.

An exploration of key models of spiritual formation found in the New Testament. This course will seek to combine the best of biblical study skills in the exegesis of several New Testament passages with their proper application to the spiritual formation of one's own life and ministry.
Prerequisites: BT 510. Special Notes: Cognate credit with SP 716.

NT 750 • Seminar in Textual Criticism. 3 Credits.

A study of paleography, sources of information about the text (Greek manuscripts, ancient versions, and patristic quotations), history of the text, principles of evaluation of variant readings, and actual evaluation of variant readings.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 751 • Seminar in the Canon of the New Testament. 1.5,3 Credits.

A study of the reasons for the initial delay in the emergence of an NT canon and for its eventual emergence, the principles of selection, and the history of the development of the canon. The last item is treated both chronologically and in terms of the individual books that were accepted or rejected.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 670 • Directed Study in New Testament. 1-9 Credits.

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Prerequisites: BT 510. Special Notes: Permission is required.

Advanced Courses in Biblical Theology

BT 610 • Issues in Global Biblical Studies. 3 Credits.

This course combines two essential pieces for preparing students for serious engagement in biblical scholarship. The first is an introduction to the history of the interpretation of the Bible, particularly the last two centuries. The second component addresses current issues in biblical scholarship, such as the use of the Old Testament in the New Testament, historiography, theological hermeneutics, biblical theology, and global approaches to biblical studies.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

BT 655 • Integrative Hermeneutics. 3 Credits.

An in-depth look at the human experience of interpretation, through the grid of philosophical hermeneutics and its intersections to theology.
Prerequisites: BT 510 Special Notes: Crosslisted with PH 655.

BT 717 • New Testament Theology. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of some of the themes of the New Testament from the standpoint of biblical theology.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

BT 751 • Seminar in Biblical Theology: New Testament. 3 Credits.

Selected themes from the biblical theology of the New Testament are examined. The course may concentrate on synoptic, Johannine, or Pauline theology.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

BT 670 • Directed Study in Biblical Theology. 1-9 Credits.

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Prerequisites: BT 510. Special Notes: Permission is required.

NT 712DE • The Use of the Old Testament in the New Testament. 1.5,3 Credits.

An exegetical examination of the ways that the New Testament quotes and alludes to the Old Testament. Methods of interpretation are studied alongside specific biblical passages, with a focus on how to understand the gospel in light of Old Testament foundations.
Prerequisites: BT 510.