The goal of Christian education is to present all people mature in Christ (Col. 1:28). When the message is embodied in a Spirit-filled, captivating teacher like Christ Himself, the Bible comes alive and people are changed. Thus, studies in Christian education are designed to help ministers become effective orchestrators of learning in their faith communities.

Objectives for students:

  • Develop a biblical/theological framework for discipleship in community;
  • Appreciate different program models of educational ministry;
  • Design an effective structure for directing volunteer services;
  • Develop a process for building dynamic ministry teams; and
  • Cultivate personal teaching skills and small group leadership abilities.

DC645 • Foundations of Youth Ministry. 3 Credits.

A philosophy of ministry to young people and their families is developed. The needs and characteristics of youth and methods of relating to them for purposes of Christian commitment and growth are presented. Family context is studied to understand youth and develop a holistic approach toward ministry.

DC646 • Communicating the Gospel to Teens. 3 Credits.

A study of the communcation process as it relates to teenagers. Strategies to communicate the gospel, evangelize, and nurture faith in teenagers are discussed. Effective proclamation and teaching techniques are studied.

DC661 • Team Leadership. 3 Credits.

This course offers an overview of the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary for sustained success in team leadership. The Bible, contemporary literature, and congregational studies are drawn together to inform the student’s leadership awareness. Principles and practices for attracting, developing, and maintaining high-performance ministry teams are examined. Special emphasis is given to identifying and discussing the critical knowledge, skills, and abilities required for sustained success in a team-based, entrepreneurial organizational setting.

DC710 • Pastoral Care of Youth. 3 Credits.

Investigation is made into the function of the pastor in relation to counseling with youth. Social and psychological factors in adolescence are studied. Problems to be considered are youth culture, youth identity crises, drug abuse, adolescent rebellion, evangelism, vocational guidance, sex education, and parent-child conflict. The role of the pastor and the church in ministering to youth and their families is stressed.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with PC710.

DC712 • Teaching for Transformation. 3 Credits.

Effective teaching is studied from the perspective of the learner, including motivational factors, needs, learning styles, life stage, and personal development. Analysis of the role of the teacher as the orchestrator of the teaching-learning process includes character, beliefs, lesson design, communication strategies, and teaching style. Course methodologies include readings, discussions, analysis of classroom teaching (via video), live observations, compressed video, focus groups, guest practitioners, and practice teaching.

DC720 • Congregational Systems. 3 Credits.

A study of the local church as an organism and organization. Each congregation is unique in identity, context, process, and program. Effective ministry requires a full and accurate interpretation of church life. This course develops basic approaches, methods, and tools for analysis of a congregation. A model for church health provides a basis for the creation of ministry strategy and problem solutions.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with ML720.

DC741 • Ministering to Adults. 3 Credits.

This course is an examination of adult developmental life cycles (including transitions), with attention given to specific ways the congregation can minister to adults in each life stage. Students conduct contextual studies on particular areas of adult programming such as ministry to singles, ministry to women, and ministry to senior adults. The impact of motivation and learning theory on the improvement of instruction and learner achievement is considered. Models of effective church and parachurch programs to adults are studied. Adult ministry plans, both developmental and functional, are developed.

DC742 • Ministering to Families. 3 Credits.

Students study the sociology of the family with special concentration on problems of the contemporary American family. Problems such as mobility, divorce, unemployment, and changing sexual ethics are discussed. New forms of the family are studied in light of the Scriptures. Church ministries to various styles of family life are developed and analyzed. Students seek to answer the question of how the church can meet the needs of families in the 21st century.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with PC742.

DC743 • Ministering with and to Senior Adults. 3 Credits.

An overview of the characteristics of life after typical retirement age provides the basis for exploring ministry to senior adults. Biblical and psychological foundations for communicating and ministering to senior adults are described and analyzed. The course addresses the challenge of providing meaningful involvement, learning, and ministry within the church and larger community.

DC745 • Family Systems. 3 Credits.

This course discusses basic family dynamics (such as intimacy, communication, power, and shame) with special emphasis given to examing those dynamics from the family system and family development theoretical perspectives. Relevant family topics (health, sexuality, spirituality, abuse, compulsive behavior, and divorce) are addressed, with opportunities for students to apply theoretical principles to real-life family situations. Special attention is given to families' interactions with the institutional church and ways in which pastors can minister more effectively to a broad range of families.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with PC745.

DC755 • Family Systems. 1.5 Credits.

This course discusses basic family dynamics (such as intimacy, communication, power, and shame) with special emphasis given to examing those dynamics from the family system and family development theoretical perspectives. Relevant family topics (health, sexuality, spirituality, abuse, compulsive behavior, and divorce) are addressed, with opportunities for students to apply theoretical principles to real-life family situations. Special attention is given to families' interactions with the institutional church and ways in which pastors can minister more effectively to a broad range of families.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with PC755.

DC759 • Growing through Small Groups. 3 Credits.

Examines the need for small groups within congregational life, strategies for forming groups, leading groups, how they provide the basic needs for pastoral care, and how they become the essential building block for growing a missional church.
Campus: San Diego. Special Notes: Crosslisted with PC759 and ML759.

DC670 • Independent Study in Discipleship in Community. 1-9 Credits.

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Special Notes: Permission is required.