All Courses By Discipline

BT 508 • The Bible and the Interpreter 1.5 Credits

An introduction to the relationship of writer, text, and reader in the interpretation process (philosophical hermeneutics) and to methods for studying the Bible (exegesis). Students will gain skills for interpreting various literary genres of Scripture.
Special Notes: Enrollment limited to M.A.M.F.T and M.A.M.H.C students.

BT 510 • Hermeneutics 3 Credits

Introduction to biblical interpretation. Analysis of relationship of author, text, and reader in the interpretive process. Analysis of biblical books using sound exegetical method: within their original cultural contexts and attending to genre and whole book context. Application of scriptural messages to contemporary contexts, respectfully engaging realities of human diversity.
Special Notes: This course should be taken as soon as possible after entering seminary and is a prerequisite for all advanced courses in biblical studies.

BT 610 • Issues in Global Biblical Studies 1.5,3 Credits

This course combines two essential pieces for preparing students for serious engagement in biblical scholarship. The first is an introduction to the history of the interpretation of the Bible, particularly the last two centuries. The second component addresses current issues in biblical scholarship, such as the use of the Old Testament in the New Testament, historiography, theological hermeneutics, biblical theology, and global approaches to biblical studies.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

BT 655 • Integrative Hermeneutics 1.5,3 Credits

An in-depth look at the human experience of interpretation, through the grid of philosophical hermeneutics and its intersections to theology.
Prerequisites: BT 510 Special Notes: Crosslisted with PH 655.

BT 663 • The Jewish World of Jesus 1.5,3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the history and literature of Second Temple Judaism from the conquests of Alexander the Great (ca. 332 B.C.) through the Bar Kokhba Revolt (A.D. 131). Particular attention will be given to the Roman rule from 63 B.C. to the fall of Jerusalem in A.D. 70. Students will read extensive portions of primary texts and be introduced to the geographical, archaeological, social and religious contexts in which Jesus lived and taught.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

BT 670 • Directed Study in Biblical Theology 1-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Prerequisites: BT 510. Special Notes: Permission is required.

BT 697 • Thesis Extension 0 Credit

Extension course for continued enrollment ; required when the thesis course is incomplete. The extension allows students continued access to university resources. Student must be registered in an extension course at the time the dissertation is granted final approval and receives a grade.
$375.

BT 716 • Old Testament Theology 1.5,3 Credits

A discussion of various theological perspectives on such prominent themes in the Old Testament revelation as creation, anthropology, sin, covenant, sacrifice, and law.
Prerequisites: BT 510. Special Notes: Crosslisted with OT 716 and TS716.

BT 717 • New Testament Theology 1.5,3 Credits

A detailed study of some of the themes of the New Testament from the standpoint of biblical theology.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

BT 751 • Seminar in Biblical Theology 1.5-3 Credits

Selected themes from biblical theology for Old and/or New Testaments.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

BT 795A • Thesis Proposal 1.5 Credits

Development of a thesis proposal and prospectus. Survey of existing research and delineation of tentative argument and preliminary bibliography. To be developed in consultation and under supervision of a faculty member as thesis advisor.
Special Notes: Approval of faculty member in relevant discipline is required.

BT 795B • Thesis Writing 3 Credits

Implementation of research plan, under the supervision of thesis advisor and with input from a second reader. To include survey of existing research and thesis that is well argued and supported by the literature.
Prerequisites: 795A.

BT 811 • BTE - Topics in Biblical Theology 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement for Biblical Theological Engagement.
Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

BT 811P • BTE Project in Biblical Theology 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement for Biblical Theological Engagement.
Prerequisites: BT 811. Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

CF 510 • Introduction to Children's and Family Ministry 3 Credits

This foundational course presents a broad overview of contemporary minstry to children and families set within the broader educational ministries of the church. The field of children's ministry are analyzed in the context of cultural trends affecting children, families, and the church. Students explore a survey of the history of religious education from Old Testament times to the present day as well as current theories of ministry to children and families. These experiences guide students in developing a biblical philosophy of ministry to children and families.

CF 610 • Ministry with Families throughout the Life Cycle 1.5,3 Credits

This course is an exploration of church ministry with families; focusing on leadership functions towards strengthening family ministry in the church and faith formation in the home. Students will examine the developmental life cycle of individuals and families. Participants will be introduced to five models of family ministry including the educational model, the counseling model, the nuclear family model, the family of families model, and the family in service model. Varied resources for family ministry will be referenced.

CF 612 • Global/Missional Perspectives 1.5,3 Credits

This course is an invitation to learn about what God is doing in children’s and family ministry in the global domain. Exploration of the 4/14 Window is foundational to understanding children as a key demographic in global ministry. Various global movements will be examined. Students will explore holistic child development and be introduced to advocacy for children and families at risk in both the North American context and the global context. Children as both recipients and agents of missional movements will be explored.
Prerequisites: CF 510.

CF 620 • The Teaching and Learning Process 1.5,3 Credits

This course is a study of the concepts which undergird learning theory, curriculum development, and curriculum assessment in children’s and family ministry. It is designed to provide an understanding of the teaching-learning process, the process of curriculum planning, curriculum evaluation and writing of curriculum materials. It also includes planning, implementing and evaluating teaching/learning experiences. The areas of creativity, learning styles, brain-based learning and multiple intelligences will be investigated through reading, discussion, classroom experiences and student-led teaching opportunities. Students will present in class, receive peer review and instructor feedback. Learning through evaluation is a key component of this course including self-evaluation.
Prerequisites: CF 510. A participation fee is associated with this course.

CF 630 • Leadership of Children's and Family Ministry 1.5,3 Credits

This course explores the essence of Christian leadership development and its influence on staff dynamics and the many facets of the administrative process within the context of a staff ministry position. Leadership emergence theory,grounded in the comparative study of life histories of biblical, historical, and contemporary leaders, forms the basis of analysis. Students will be encouraged to examine biblical leadership and the practical skills of creating and maintaining effective ministry teams, healthy staff relationships and dynamic programs for children and families.
Prerequisites: CF 510.

CF 670 • Directed Study in Children's and Family Ministries 1-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Special Notes: Permission is required.

CF 751 • Seminar in C & F Ministry 1.5,3 Credits

A Master of Divinity concentration course; an in-depth study of a particular children and family ministry theme.

CM 601 • Street Culture, the Poor and Urban Ministry 1.5,3 Credits

This course explores the current problems of urban society and the challenges these realities present to churches. A review of past and present responses to urban society by the church is considered with a view toward developing strategies for the present and future. The course is intended for all interested in formulating a theology of ministry—not solely for those interested in urban ministry.

CM 605 • Theology of Poverty and Biblical Justice 1.5,3 Credits

This course is designed to provide a theological and practical framework on poverty and biblical justice. How we help the poor and respond to issues of social justice from biblical values shapes our strategy and mission. Topics include but are not limited to: poverty, immigration reform, economic inequality and prison reform movements, etc. The focus on the class will examine social issues from both a historical, theological and practical perspective. This class will place special emphasis on guiding local congregations to understand a specific social issue and develop an appropriate response.

CM 606 • Nonprofit Management 1.5,3 Credits

This is an introduction course that is intended to prepare students for management roles in nonprofit organizations and to provide an understanding of key management functions. This course provides a foundation for understanding nonprofit organizations within the greater context of the nonprofit sector and society as a whole. Topics will include: history of nonprofits, current “nonprofit nation,” management and leadership theory, program development operating strategies, board responsibilities, human resource management and advocacy.

CM 607 • Community Organizing 1.5,3 Credits

The study of social change prepares non-profit practitioners to understand the historic and regional environment in which they operate. Students will be exposed to different change models with an emphasis on the history and development of Consensus Organizing as a practical approach. Participants will learn concrete skills necessary to apply Consensus Organizing within their practice setting.

CM 608 • Fund Development and Marketing 1.5,3 Credits

This course is intended to explore the fundamentals of fund development and marketing programs within nonprofit organizations. Students will learn to design messages and communication materials for key constituencies and stakeholders, identify and develop a well-balanced base of support from individual donors and institutional funders and gain knowledge of common fundraising cycles and philanthropy programs. Special emphasis will be placed on accessing government funding and planning, researching and writing grants. Students will learn about developing a brand and marketing strategy and implementation tactics including social media, video, and public relations. Throughout the course there will be discussions on the ethical issues, technical tools and skills inherent within resource development and marketing in a nonprofit setting. The goal of this course is to ensure that each student gains a broad understanding of resource development and marketing communications.

CM 652 • Practice in Community Development 1.5,3 Credits

The application of principles of holistic community development as studied through case studies and field experiences either in the local or global contexts - allowing the student to build a project that is contiguous with vocational goals.

CM 670 • Directed Study in Community Ministry 1-6 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Special Notes: Permission is required.

CM 751 • Seminar in Community Ministry 1.5,3 Credits

A Masters Degree elective course; an in-depth study of a particular community ministry theme.

CP 510 • Introduction to Preaching 3 Credits

Demonstration of the effective communication of God’s Word using clarity, purpose, and relevance to contemporary contexts. Creation of transformational opportunities for listeners. Application of Scriptural messages in both personal and professional practice while integrating exegetical insights and intercultural understanding.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

CP 610 • Communication and Organizational Leadership 1.5,3 Credits

This course is designed to address the essential elements of leadership communication. A model for leadership communication is presented, and students are challenged to process a wide range of material related to the foundations of leadership communication, organizational culture, organizational conflict, and organizational change.
Prerequisites: CP 510. Special Notes: Crosslisted with ML 610.

CP 710 • Sermon on the Mount 1.5,3 Credits

This course is to offer an ongoing exposition of the Sermon on the Mount with a view toward effective exposition (preaching, teaching, writing, etc.). While poring over the text of the Sermon on the Mount (SoM), students will reflect on steps for exposition of the book’s message while considering the nature of effective biblical exposition in their respective contexts. Deliberate attention is given to integration of personal formation, professional exposition, and faithful biblical interpretation.

CP 720 • Finding Your Voice in Preaching 1.5,3 Credits

This course focuses on helping students discover the preaching style that best fits their unique makeup. Focus is given to the study of various styles of preaching, including styles found in diverse contexts. Students are encouraged to discover their own voice in communicating the message of the Bible by integrating the learning they have done in personal spiritual development.
Prerequisites: CP 510.

CP 743 • Effective Communication from Old Testament Genres 1.5,3 Credits

Students learn how to faithfully communicate the depth of truth found in the passages of the Old Testament. We focus on the process of personally internalizing the biblical text in preparation for preaching it. Attention is given to the preparation of sermons that are biblically and hermeneutically sound as well as transformative in the lives of the preacher and the listener.
Prerequisites: CP 510.

CP 744 • Effective Communication from New Testament Genres 1.5,3 Credits

The recording of Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection and the impact it had on the entire world has radical implications for our lives today. Students work to create effective communication that brings to bear the revelation of the New Testament on today’s world. This course involves the study of the hermeneutical issues related to the arranging of representative genres of the New Testament materials for preaching.
Prerequisites: CP 510.

CP 752 • Seminar in Communications and Preaching 1.5-3 Credits

An in-depth study of a particular communications and preaching theme.

CP 762 • Understanding Your Audience 1.5,3 Credits

This course focuses on preparing speakers to shape their messages to communicate effectively with different audiences. Speakers develop an understanding of how to address audiences with whom they will interact regularly, as well as those with whom they have significant differences in background, worldview, and culture. Students develop and deliver two sermons for audiences that are foreign to their experience and background.
Prerequisites: CP 510.

CP 763 • Integrating Media and the Arts in Preaching 1.5,3 Credits

This class explores the use of different forms of media as tools for communicating a given message. Attention is given to the use of media such as PowerPoint, video, film clips, drama, art, and music, as well as to the study of communicators who use the media and arts effectively in preaching. Students preach a minimum of two sermons using media and the arts to communicate their message. An understanding of the approach to preaching presented in CP 510 is assumed.
Prerequisites: CP 510.

CP 870 • Directed Study in Communications and Preaching 1-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor. Permission is required.

CP 870P • Independent Study Project in Communications and Preaching 1-9 Credits

Research and study project by arrangement with the professor. Permission is required.

DC 635YL • Foundations of Incarnational Youth Ministry (Young Life Staff Training) 1.5,3 Credits

This course gives an overview of contemporary culture, especially as it affects youth ministry, and provides historical and theological youth ministry concepts and grounding. In addition, a broad spectrum of ministry programs and issues will be addressed, such as “youth ministry as practical theology,” the changing family, organizing a ministry program, missions and service, and ministering in a multi-cultural, multi-contextual world.

DC 636YL • Life of Christ: Communicating Christ to Adolescent Culture (Young Life Staff Trng) 1.5,3 Credits

Focuses on the process of communicating the person and work of Jesus to adolescents. Communication principles involving small and large groups as well as individual discussions will be applied as the student seeks to understand insights from the four Gospels and learns to communicate those effectively in contemporary youth culture.

DC 637YL • Youth Ministry Leadership and Community Dev (Young Life Staff Training) 1.5,3 Credits

This course provides students with the foundational principles and skills involved in leading/managing a team of people as a youth minister. Special attention will be given to thinking and living biblically as a leader and also to strategic planning for building ministry. Emphasis will also be placed on developing community resources for ministry and clarifying one’s theology of leadership in the context of their ministry calling.

DC 645 • Foundations of Youth Ministry 1.5,3 Credits

A philosophy of ministry to young people and their families is developed. The needs and characteristics of youth and methods of relating to them for purposes of Christian commitment and growth are presented. Family context is studied to understand youth and develop a holistic approach toward ministry.

DC 645YL • Foundations of Youth Ministry 1.5,3 Credits

A philosophy of ministry to young people and their families is developed. The needs and characteristics of youth and methods of relating to them for purposes of Christian commitment and growth are presented. Family context is studied to understand youth and develop a holistic approach toward ministry.

DC 646 • Communicating the Gospel to Teens 1.5,3 Credits

A study of the communcation process as it relates to teenagers. Strategies to communicate the gospel, evangelize, and nurture faith in teenagers are discussed. Effective proclamation and teaching techniques are studied.

DC 646YL • Communicating the Gospel to Teens 1.5,3 Credits

A study of the communcation process as it relates to teenagers. Strategies to communicate the gospel, evangelize, and nurture faith in teenagers are discussed. Effective proclamation and teaching techniques are studied.

DC 661 • Team Leadership 1.5,3 Credits

This course offers an overview of the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary for sustained success in team leadership. The Bible, contemporary literature, and congregational studies are drawn together to inform the student’s leadership awareness. Principles and practices for attracting, developing, and maintaining high-performance ministry teams are examined. Special emphasis is given to identifying and discussing the critical knowledge, skills, and abilities required for sustained success in a team-based, entrepreneurial organizational setting.

DC 670 • Directed Study in Discipleship in Community 1-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Special Notes: Permission is required.

DC 710 • Pastoral Care of Youth 1.5,3 Credits

Investigation is made into the function of the pastor in relation to counseling with youth. Social and psychological factors in adolescence are studied. Problems to be considered are youth culture, youth identity crises, drug abuse, adolescent rebellion, evangelism, vocational guidance, sex education, and parent-child conflict. The role of the pastor and the church in ministering to youth and their families is stressed.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with PC 710.

DC 712 • Teaching for Transformation 1.5,3 Credits

Effective teaching is studied from the perspective of the learner, including motivational factors, needs, learning styles, life stage, and personal development. Analysis of the role of the teacher as the orchestrator of the teaching-learning process includes character, beliefs, lesson design, communication strategies, and teaching style. Course methodologies include readings, discussions, analysis of classroom teaching (via video), live observations, compressed video, focus groups, guest practitioners, and practice teaching.

DC 720 • Congregational Systems 1.5,3 Credits

A study of the local church as an organism and organization. Each congregation is unique in identity, context, process, and program. Effective ministry requires a full and accurate interpretation of church life. This course develops basic approaches, methods, and tools for analysis of a congregation. A model for church health provides a basis for the creation of ministry strategy and problem solutions.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with ML720.

DC 741 • Ministering to Adults 1.5,3 Credits

This course is an examination of adult developmental life cycles (including transitions), with attention given to specific ways the congregation can minister to adults in each life stage. Students conduct contextual studies on particular areas of adult programming such as ministry to singles, ministry to women, and ministry to senior adults. The impact of motivation and learning theory on the improvement of instruction and learner achievement is considered. Models of effective church and parachurch programs to adults are studied. Adult ministry plans, both developmental and functional, are developed.

DC 742 • Ministering to Families 1.5,3 Credits

Students study the sociology of the family with special concentration on problems of the contemporary American family. Problems such as mobility, divorce, unemployment, and changing sexual ethics are discussed. New forms of the family are studied in light of the Scriptures. Church ministries to various styles of family life are developed and analyzed. Students seek to answer the question of how the church can meet the needs of families in the 21st century.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with PC 742.

DC 743 • Ministering with and to Senior Adults 1.5,3 Credits

An overview of the characteristics of life after typical retirement age provides the basis for exploring ministry to senior adults. Biblical and psychological foundations for communicating and ministering to senior adults are described and analyzed. The course addresses the challenge of providing meaningful involvement, learning, and ministry within the church and larger community.

DC 745 • Family Systems 1.5,3 Credits

This course discusses basic family dynamics (such as intimacy, communication, power, and shame) with special emphasis given to examing those dynamics from the family system and family development theoretical perspectives. Relevant family topics (health, sexuality, spirituality, abuse, compulsive behavior, and divorce) are addressed, with opportunities for students to apply theoretical principles to real-life family situations. Special attention is given to families' interactions with the institutional church and ways in which pastors can minister more effectively to a broad range of families.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with PC 745.

DC 749 • Spiritual Direction 1.5,3 Credits

Development of a working definition of spiritual direction and an understanding of the unique characteristics of discipling, mentoring, counseling, and directing relationships. The roles of director and directee, the life of faith and the growth of prayer, the conduct of spiritual direction relationships, and possible benefits and hazards are among the topics considered. Christian educators, pastors, and lay persons respond to the assignments of the course in ways that are suitable for their particular situations.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with SP 749.

DC 751 • Seminar in Discipleship 1.5,3 Credits

A Masters Degree elective course; an in-depth study of a particular discipleship and community theme.

DC 755 • Family Systems 1.5,3 Credits

This course discusses basic family dynamics (such as intimacy, communication, power, and shame) with special emphasis given to examing those dynamics from the family system and family development theoretical perspectives. Relevant family topics (health, sexuality, spirituality, abuse, compulsive behavior, and divorce) are addressed, with opportunities for students to apply theoretical principles to real-life family situations. Special attention is given to families' interactions with the institutional church and ways in which pastors can minister more effectively to a broad range of families.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with PC 755.

DC 759 • Growing through Small Groups 1.5,3 Credits

Examines the need for small groups within congregational life, strategies for forming groups, leading groups, how they provide the basic needs for pastoral care, and how they become the essential building block for growing a missional church.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with PC 759 and ML759.

GC 512 • Global, Cultural and Contextual Ministry 3 Credits

Examination of culture through a biblical lens as the context of all ministry. Development and application of one’s understanding of cultures to the missional mandate of the local and global church. Exploration of structural impediments to the church’s mission, including racism, sexism, power differentials, and the reconciling power of the gospel to transform churches and their communities.
$100 IDI Assessment Fee.

GC 565A • Cross-Cultural Internship 0.5 Credits

This course supports spiritual, personal, and vocational formation through service in a cross-cultural internship setting related to the student’s intended field of service. Vocational skills are developed and strengthened through learning covenant goals emphasizing biblical and theological foundations, spiritual and personal formation, transformational leadership, intercultural competence, and holistic integration. Training, theological reflection, accountability, and assessment are provided through on-and-off campus interactions with qualified mentors and peers.
Prerequisites: SP 510, GC 512, and GC609. Special Notes: This course is for San Diego MA and MDiv students with a Missional Leadership Concentration.

GC 565B • Cross-Cultural Internship 1 Credit

This course supports spiritual, personal, and vocational formation through service in a cross-cultural internship setting related to the student’s intended field of service. Vocational skills are developed and strengthened through learning covenant goals emphasizing biblical and theological foundations, spiritual and personal formation, transformational leadership, intercultural competence, and holistic integration. Training, theological reflection, accountability, and assessment are provided through on-and-off campus interactions with qualified mentors and peers.
Prerequisites: GC 565A. Special Notes: This course is for San Diego MA and MDiv students with a Missional Leadership Concentration.

GC 565C • Cross-Cultural Internship 0.5 Credits

This course supports spiritual, personal, and vocational formation through service in a cross-cultural internship setting related to the student’s intended field of service. Vocational skills are developed and strengthened through learning covenant goals emphasizing biblical and theological foundations, spiritual and personal formation, transformational leadership, intercultural competence, and holistic integration. Training, theological reflection, accountability, and assessment are provided through on-and-off campus interactions with qualified mentors and peers.
Prerequisites: GC 565A, GC 565B. Special Notes: This course is for San Diego MA and MDiv students with a Missional Leadership Concentration.

GC 565D • Cross-Cultural Internship 1 Credit

This course supports spiritual, personal, and vocational formation through service in a cross-cultural internship setting related to the student’s intended field of service. Vocational skills are developed and strengthened through learning covenant goals emphasizing biblical and theological foundations, spiritual and personal formation, transformational leadership, intercultural competence, and holistic integration. Training, theological reflection, accountability, and assessment are provided through on-and-off campus interactions with qualified mentors and peers.
Prerequisites: GC 565A, GC 565B, GC 565C. Special Notes: This course is for San Diego MA and MDiv students with a Missional Leadership Concentration.

GC 610 • Cross-Cultural Communication 1.5,3 Credits

This course examines the dynamics of the communication process and the ways in which various cultures, audience segments, or value orientations condition the interpretation of different symbol systems. Each student selects a culture or subculture to evaluate its most dominant worldview components and the approaches to church work that are most likely to be effective in that setting.

GC 611 • Christianity in Culture 1.5,3 Credits

Culture is studied to help those serving in various ministry contexts to identify the distinctives of culture and Christian heritage; to distinguish the secular aspects of heritage from the distinctly Christian elements; and to know when to hold firm or to be flexible when providing pastoral care for people of other generations or cultures.

GC 612 • Cross Cultural Leadership 1.5,3 Credits

This course examines the biblical purposes and function of leadership through a cross-cultural understanding of how to first serve and then lead. Aspects of vision casting, influencing change, and becoming missional leaders are discussed as to cultural leadership characteristics. The emphasis for the student is on how to encourage and develop leaders more than how to function as a leader in a host culture.

GC 615 • Communications and Culture 1.5,3 Credits

This course seeks to explore various ways in which culture affects the effective communication of the Christian message. It is largely a study of issues and practices related to effective cross-cultural or intercultural communication, with attention to understanding cultural contexts and barriers and applications to effective Christian witness across, and within, cultures. The course examines the dynamics of the communication process and the ways in which various cultures, audience segments, or value orientations condition the interpretation and communication of the Bible and other messages. Areas of focus include the nature of cultural contexts and their impact upon perceptions, values, beliefs, and social structures. Each student selects a culture or sub-culture, evaluating the dominant worldview components and developing a strategy for effectively communicating the Christian faith to persons within such cultures.

GC 618YL • The Kingdom of God and Cultural Intelligence (Young Life Staff Training) 1.5,3 Credits

This course addresses cultural self-awareness and cross-cultural competence for building healthy relationships within diverse communities. Drawing upon biblical, anthropological, sociological and cross-cultural communication theories, students gain basic tools for researching and interacting among a variety of cultural, ethnic, and religious groups.

GC 632 • World Religions 1.5,3 Credits

This couse is a study of the world religions that provide structures of belief and meaning for vast numbers of people in America and globally. A primary goal is to develop the understanding and sensitivities necessary to represent Christ attractively, and communicate His Gospel intelligibly, to adherents of these faiths. It is also an opportunity to develop an informed Christian theology of religions.
Prerequisites: TS 512 (recommended). Special Notes: Crosslisted with TS 632.

GC 650 • Missions in Global Urban Context 1.5,3 Credits

This course explores many of the critical issues arising from the rapid urbanization occurring around the world, and examines the numerous elements involved in effective ministry/missions in an international urban context. Students explore the many issues involved in adequately exegeting a major urban context. The course examines the impact of urbanization upon the task of communicating the Christian message and of establishing a dynamic and reproducing church in an international urban context. Specific aspects explored include ministry to the urban poor, ministry to immigrants and migrants (both in-country and foreign), ministry to international students, and a variety of social ministries that can significantly influence urban ministry.

GC 660 • Change Agency 1.5,3 Credits

This is a course in applied anthropology and cultural dynamics with special attention given to how culture change occurs, the dynamics and variables that effect change, and appropriate strategies for the effective change agent, whether an individual or an organization. The course will also focus on contemporary areas of social responsibility for Christian advocates and agents of change. This course will assist church leaders (in the U.S. or overseas), missionaries, anthropologists, development agencies, social ministries, and others in understanding how change occurs, how to effectively introduce change into organizations and communities, how to evaluate when we should and should not introduce change, and what the biblical and theological foundation is for our personal involvement as advocates for and agents of change.

GC 670 • Directed Study in Global and Contextual Ministries 1-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Special Notes: Permission is required.

GC 673 • Cross-Cultural Experience 1.5,3 Credits

Shaped as an independent study around a cross-cultural experience of the student, usually as part of a global mission project or as a local ethnic ministry. This is arranged with the ML professor to create an in-depth study in which the experience will occur.

GC 700 • Understanding Islam 1.5,3 Credits

The study of Islam as both a system of beliefs and as a culture, how Islam is growing and accomplishing its own 'evangelism,' and ways in which the Gospel can engage Muslim followers within their particular culture and sect of Islam.

GC 704 • Religion in Anthropology 1.5,3 Credits

The study of basic roles of religion in society, including its role as explanation system and means of social regulation; how worldviews influence cultures, how to use ethnography and to analyze culture to describe religion, worldview values, tradition, and structures of faith.

GC 708 • History of World Missions 1.5,3 Credits

A survey of the missionary movements on the major continents with special emphasis on biographies, types of mission field, and missionary strategy. Special Notes: May be taken in substitute for HS 510.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with HS 708.

GC 711 • Spiritism and Folk Beliefs 1.5,3 Credits

A study of how folk beliefs become the practice in major religions (Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Hispanic Catholicism), the importance of recognizing the 'excluded middle' in cultural beliefs, and issues of spiritual warfare and syncretism to be considered in communicating the Gospel.

GC 739 • Theology in a Global Context 1.5,3 Credits

This course addresses key intersections between theology and culture and explores questions and issues related to contextuality in theologizing. It does so by close readings, discussions, and analysis of contemporary theologies coming from beyond the traditional Euro-American context, including African, Asian, Latin American, and other non-Western contexts. Themes of focus include Christology, anthropology, and the doctrine of salvation.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with TS 739.

GC 751 • Seminar in Global Studies 1.5,3 Credits

A Masters Degree elective course; an in-depth study of a particular global and contextual studies theme.

GC 870 • Directed Study in Global and Contextual Leadership 3 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor. Permission is required.

GS 001 • Graduate Research Seminar: Masters Level 0 Credit

The Graduate Research Seminar is a requirement for all students in a masters degree program. The seminar teaches students to design their research methodologies to most effectively complete course assignments. By learning how to efficiently use library tools and services, a student will save time and effort when completing assignments. The class will also focus on evaluating, citing, and using source material properly.

GS 006 • Graduate Research Seminar: MFT Degree 0 Credit

The Graduate Research Seminar is a requirement for all students in the MFT degree program. The seminar teaches students to design their research methodologies to most effectively complete course assignments. By learning how to efficiently use library tools and services, a student will save time and effort when completing assignments. The class will also focus on evaluating, citing, and using source material properly.

GS 007 • Graduate Research Seminar: Doctoral Level 0 Credit

The Graduate Research Seminar is a requirement for all students in a degree program. The seminar teaches students to design their research methodologies to most effectively complete course assignments. By learning how to efficiently use library tools and services, a student will save time and effort when completing assignments. The class will also focus on evaluating, citing, and using source material properly.

GS 670 • Directed Study in General Studies 1-3 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Special Notes: Permission is required.

GS 751 • Seminar in General Studies 1.5-3 Credits

An in-depth study of a particular theme.

GS 780 • Senior Integrative Seminar 3 Credits

Integration of theology, leadership, and formation into personal, professional, and interdisciplinary understanding and practice. Exploration and analysis of diverse case dilemmas across multiple disciplines, with the ability to contextualize the messages of scripture in respectful and engaging ways. Demonstration of critical thinking, intercultural competence, and integration, within the context of respectful, professional dialogue.
Special Notes: This course must be taken in the student’s final year.

GS 801 • Integral Research & Writing 3 Credits

The culmination of all doctoral level work is a research project commonly called a thesis or dissertation. Because the Doctor of Ministry degree is a "professional" doctoral degree, its focus is more practical than academic. However, it still requires a very high level of research, analysis, synthesis and writing. The purpose of the research project is to contribute new knowledge, models, and/or methodologies to the practice of ministry. The research project may also focus on discovering solutions to ministry challenges. Integral Research and Writing provides students with a comprehensive conceptual framework for conducting effective qualitative (and/or mixed method) research. This course also introduces students to a variety of research methodologies from which to pursue their research. Additionally, students will participate in an Integral Research Inventory to help them discover their most natural “research path” and begin the process of developing an integral research proposal. Students will also be exposed to matters related to doctoral level research writing and become familiar with the style guide that dictates the final form the research project report will take. This is a required course and should be taken by all students no later than their second course.

GS 801P • Integral Research & Writing: Project 3 Credits

The successful completion of a series of course-related ministry projects is an important component of the Doctor of Ministry program. Project courses in the Doctor of Ministry program take two forms: (1) projects prescribed by the course instructor that relate to the previous Content Course, or (2) student-designed projects related to the student’s ministry setting. The specific expectations of the course project will be approved by the course instructor during the Content Course prior to the Project Course.
Prerequisites: GS 801.

GS 897 • Dissertation Extension 0 Credit

Extension course for continued enrollment ; required when the thesis course is incomplete. The extension allows students continued access to university resources. Student must be registered in an extension course at the time the dissertation is granted final approval and receives a grade. Fee applies.

GS 901 • Thesis Proposal Foundations 3 Credits

Thesis Proposal Foundations (GS 901) and Thesis Proposal Workshop (GS 902) are two parts within a combined course unit and are to be taken in order in subsequent terms. For GS 901, students orient themselves to the nature of research proposals and the purpose of research. Additionally, students use GS 901 as a place to identify and refine their research topics, crystallize this topic in the form of a problem and response statement, begin to explore the relevant literature related to the topic, and develop a preliminary bibliography related to this literature. The identification and submission of a problem and response statement and the development and submission of a preliminary bibliography are the primary outcomes for Thesis Proposal Foundations. These outcomes serve as the basis upon which the Thesis Proposal Workshop will be conducted.

GS 902 • Thesis Proposal Workshop 3 Credits

All students in the Doctor of Ministry program will participate in a one-week thesis proposal workshop. Each participant will develop and bring to the workshop a preliminary thesis proposal developed according to guidelines stated in the pre-course assignments and based upon the work done in GS 901. The week will be spent in a process of modification, expansion and refinement of this proposal as well as in development of a strategy for proposal implementation and for the writing of the thesis project report.
Prerequisites: GS 901.

GS 991 • Thesis Project A 3 Credits

This course is for students who have completed GS 901 Thesis Proposal Foundations and GS 902 Thesis Proposal Workshop and are currently working on their thesis writing and engaged with their Thesis Advisor.
Prerequisites: GS 901, GS 902. Special Notes: This course is required and is Pass/ Fail.

GS 992 • Thesis Project B 3 Credits

This course is for students who have completed GS 991 Thesis Project 1, have an approved thesis proposal, are currently working on their thesis writing, and are engaged with their Thesis Advisor.
Prerequisites: GS 991. Special Notes: This course is required and is Pass/ Fail.

GS 993 • Thesis Project C 3 Credits

This course is for students who have completed GS 991/ GS 992 Thesis Project 1 and 2 and are currently working on their thesis writing and engaged with their Thesis Advisor. It is taken in the spring semester of the year they intend to graduate. This course is required and is graded by the Thesis Advisor based on the entire thesis and the oral defense. Students not meeting the guidelines will be put in extension status and required to meet graduation deadlines again the following year.
Prerequisites: GS 991, GS 992.

HS 501 • Church History: From the Early Church to the Reformation 1.5 Credits

An introduction to the major movements within Christian history from the beginnings of the church to the 16th century. Students will also be introduced to basic methodology and bibliographical tools used in the study of the past.

HS 502 • Church History: The Church in the Modern World 1.5 Credits

An introduction to the major movements within Christian history since the Protestant Reformation of the 16th century. Students will also be involved in primary research in the field of church history.
Prerequisites: HS 501.

HS 510 • Church History Survey 3 Credits

Introduction to the major movements, ideas, figures, and events within Christian history from the beginnings of the Church to the present era. Introduction to basic methodology and bibliographical tools used to study the past. Analysis of primary and secondary church history materials. Application of ecclesiastical and doctrinal traditions of the past to contemporary movements, theological thinking, and Christian ministries.

HS 512 • American Christianity 1.5 Credits

Introduction to major events and trends within American Christianity, from the late fifteenth century to the early twenty-first. Evaluation of the ways in which the American Christian landscape and each participant’s theology and ministry have been shaped by various events, trends, and ideas. Hands-on historical research and in-depth analysis of primary sources while exploring local details of this changing landscape.

HS 601 • History of Christian Thought: The Early Church to Scholasticism 1.5,3 Credits

A survey of the major historical, cultural, and theological factors influencing the development of doctrine to Aquinas, with major analysis of the work of the Ante- and Post-Nicene councils and their subsequent influence on the articulation of the structure of theological thought.
Prerequisites: HS 510. Special Notes: Crosslisted with TS 601.

HS 602 • History of Christian Thought: Scholasticism to Enlightenment 1.5,3 Credits

An analysis of theological renewal based on inductive study from the writings of Wycliffe, Hus, Luther, Calvin, the Anabaptists, Elizabethan-American Puritans, and John Wesley.
Prerequisites: HS 510. Special Notes: Crosslisted with TS 602.

HS 603 • History of Christian Thought: 19th Century to the Present 1.5,3 Credits

An analysis of contemporary theology as it is reflected in the formative periods of the 19th to the present, with particular reference to the modern era and its significance to contemporary church life.
Prerequisites: HS 510. Special Notes: Crosslisted with TS 603.

HS 611 • Women in the Christian Tradition 1.5,3 Credits

An exploration of the life, thought, and context of selected Christian women across the centuries. Issues of public values, personal identity, and group affiliations have long been important to this discussion. Since the mid-19th century, and particularly in the dramatic changes in the roles and experience of women since WWII, interpretive voices (e.g., in the literature) have notably both reflected and shaped the realities. The goal of this course is to engage the "cloud of woman-witnesses," in their cultures, in a manner that will enlighten and inspire one's own life.

HS 640 • Christian Lives and Spirituality in History 1.5,3 Credits

This course tells the story of Christianity through the life experiences of selected men and women in their historical contexts. Utilizing several varieties of literature, these people are valued both as insightful mentors and as unique persons in need of God's grace and human community. Students are invited to reflect on their own spiritual journeys and vocations.
Prerequisites:TS 512.

HS 652 • Christian Spiritual Life: Henri Nouwen 1.5,3 Credits

A study of major themes in the thought of Henri Nouwen (1932-1996), one of the most influential Chrisitan spiritual writers of our generation. The emphasis is on primary sources, set in the framework of his life and development, and complemented by reflections from the instructor, who served as a teaching fellow with Nouwen during the author's Harvard years (1983-1985). The goal is for this experience to provide critical insights and personal values that illuminate and encourage our lives as beloved and faithful children of the Lord.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with SP 652.

HS 653 • Readings in the Theology of John Calvin 1.5,3 Credits

This course analyzes and evaluates the mature theology of John Calvin as presented in the 1559 edition of the Institutes of the Christian Religion.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with TS 653.

HS 662 • Topics in Historical Studies 1.5,3 Credits

HS 670 • Directed Study in Church History 1-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Special Notes: Permission is required.

HS 675 • Creeds & Confessions of the Reformed Church 1.5,3 Credits

An exploration of the theology of the Reformed Tradition through the study of nine creeds and confessions. The course also discusses how the pressure of church heresies and conflicts, as well as national pressures, brought together some of the most important theological statements the church has produced. In addition, the course explores the theological expressions surrounding the doctrines of the person and nature of Christ, the sacraments, election, the Bible and its interpretation, the church, and the relationship of church and state. Crosslisted with TS 675.

HS 697 • Thesis Extension 0 Credit

Extension course for continued enrollment ; required when the thesis course is incomplete. The extension allows students continued access to university resources. Student must be registered in an extension course at the time the dissertation is granted final approval and receives a grade.
$375.

HS 703 • Christian Classics 1.5,3 Credits

An evaluation of important Christian literature, from Augustine's Confessions to C.S. Lewis' Till We have Faces. Attention will be directed to the context of several types of classics, as well as to their authors and messages.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with SP 703.

HS 708 • History of World Missions 1.5,3 Credits

A survey of the missionary movements on the major continents with special emphasis on biographies, types of mission field, and missionary strategy. Special Notes: May be taken in substitute for HS 510.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with GC 708.

HS 712 • Minorities and American Christianity 1.5,3 Credits

A study of African American, American Indian, and Hispanic Christianity. Examines the history of each group, their contributions to American Christianity, and the special problems each group faces.

HS 726 • History and Theology of Ministry 1.5,3 Credits

This course invites the student to a survey of important theological expressions and models in the history of Christian ministries from the first century through the present day. We consider selected themes (WISHMAP), illustrated by classic and contemporary sources, within a chronological framework. The goal is for these “voices” to enlighten and inspire our lives in faithful, fruitful service for Jesus Christ and the Kingdom.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with ML 726 and TS 726.

HS 751 • Seminar in Historical Studies 1.5,3 Credits

A Masters Degree elective course; an in-depth study of a particular historical studies theme.

HS 790 • Advanced Seminars 1.5,3 Credits

Specialized studies will be offered for those interested in any period of church history.

HS 795A • Thesis Proposal 1.5 Credits

Development of a thesis proposal and prospectus. Survey of existing research and delineation of tentative argument and preliminary bibliography. To be developed in consultation and under supervision of a faculty member as thesis advisor.
Special Notes: Approval of faculty member in relevant discipline is required.

HS 795B • Thesis Writing 3 Credits

Implementation of research plan, under the supervision of thesis advisor and with input from a second reader. To include survey of existing research and thesis that is well argued and supported by the literature.
Prerequisites: HS 795A.

HS 811 • BTE Topics in Historical Studies 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement for Biblical Theological Engagement.
Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

HS 811P • BTE Project - Historical Study 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement for Biblical Theological Engagement.
Prerequisites: HS 811. Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

HS 815 • CFC/CL Topics in Historical Studies 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement for either Congregation and Family Care or Church Leadership.
Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for CFC or CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

HS 815P • CFC/CL Project in Historical Studies 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement for either Congregation and Family Care or Church Leadership.
Prerequisites: HS 815. Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for CFC or CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

HS 862 • Topics in Historical Studies 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement when paired with the corresponding project course, HS 862P. Concentration topic varies based on scheduling and student interest.

HS 862P • Project in Historical Studies 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement.
Prerequisites: HS 862.

MF 611 • Foundations of Marriage and Family Studies 3 Credits

This course examines the historical development and theoretical foundations of marriage and family studies, as well as theological issues in the study of marriage and family and the practice of marriage and family therapy. Special attention is given to family systems theory. Students are encouraged to examine their own assumptions about families and to develop increased congruence between their theological convictions and their theoretical perspectives.
Special Notes: Enrollment limited to students in M.A.M.F.T.

MF 612 • Families in Context: Gender, Class and Culture 3 Credits

This course explores differences in family structure and interaction related to race, ethnicity, culture, and socioeconomic status. The influences of gender role perceptions are examined. Students identify challenges of providing therapy and pastoral care to families who differ from themselves in terms of gender, class, and culture.
Prerequisites: MF 611. Special Notes: Enrollment limited to students in the M.A.M.F.T. Campus: St. Paul.

MF 613 • Dynamics of Family Interaction: Sexuality, Spirituality and Socialization 3 Credits

This course analyzes dynamic processes of family and couple relationships such as love and intimacy; communication; shame; power; family stress; and coping. Family changes such as divorce, remarriage, and grief are also addressed. Special attention is given to the ways couples and families interact around issues of sexuality and spirituality. Students are encouraged to develop an awareness of the influences of these family dynamics in their own families of origin.
Prerequisites: MF 611. Special Notes: Enrollment limited to students in the M.A.M.F.T. Campus: St. Paul.

MF 621 • Individual Development Within the Family 3 Credits

This course explores the development of individuals within the family over the life cycle. Childhood, adolescent, and adult development and aging are examined with attention given to physical, spiritual, intellectual, and social development and their implications for the practice of therapy and pastoral care.
Prerequisites: MF 611. Campus: St. Paul.

MF 622 • Individual and Family Psychopathology I 3 Credits

This course helps students understand and identify individual and relational problems and gain awareness of abnormal and/or unhealthy development of individuals and relationships. The course includes introduction to and critique of DSM-5 diagnostic categories.
Prerequisites: MF 611, MF 621, or concurrent with MF 621. Special Notes: Enrollment limited to students in M.A.M.F.T.

MF 623 • Individual and Family Psychopathology II 3 Credits

This course helps students assess and diagnose relational problems and mental illness and disorders in children, adolescents, and adults. The course includes thorough interaction with the DSM-5 diagnostic categories.
Prerequisites: MF 611, MF 622. Campus: St. Paul.

MF 624 • Challenges over the Family Life Cycle 3 Credits

Students examine therapeutic strategies for addressing developmental issues throughout the family life cycle, such as marriage preparation, transition to parenthood, parenting over the life cycle, work and family issues, chronic illness, and aging.
Prerequisites: MF 611. Campus: St. Paul.

MF 625 • Theories and Best Practices of Marital and Family Therapy I 3 Credits

Students review and critique--from theological, spiritual, and theoretical perspectives--the major approaches to family therapy. Applications of techniques from these approaches are practiced in class. Students also examine the place of marriage and family therapy in pastoral care and begin to articulate their own approach to working with families. Campus: San Diego.

MF 626 • Theories and Best Practices of Marital and Family Therapy II 3 Credits

Working with case studies, students will build on their knowledge of MFT theories by focusing on theory-based assessment, treatment planning, goal prioritization and intervention informed by the recovery model. Therapy adaptations will be explored for a variety of clinical settings with culturally and economically diverse clinical populations. Special emphasis will be given to AAMFT's Core Competencies and self-of-therapist dynamics.
Prerequisites: MF 625. Campus: St. Paul.

MF 627 • Research Design and Evaluation 3 Credits

Examination of qualitative and quantitative research designs in individual, couple and family therapy. Evaluation of published research to ground therapeutic responses to individual, couple and family concerns. Application of research methodologies and ethics principles to research practice.
Prerequisites: MF 625 or MH 625. Campus: San Diego.

MF 629 • Community Mental Health 3 Credits

The history of community mental health care provides a context for introducing students to contemporary mental health issues and services especially in Southern California. The course emphasizes strengths based systemic recovery-oriented treatment with consumers, their families, and their communities who struggle with the challenges, among others, of severe mental illness, chronic medical conditions, poverty, joblessness, and violence. Direct contact with public and private agencies and their clients is a core part of this course.
Prerequisites: MF 625 and MF 646. Campus: San Diego

MF 631 • Professional and Ethical Issues in Marriage & Family Therapy 3 Credits

This course address legal and ethical situations arising in the practice of marital and family therapy and examine unique challenges of maintaining appropriate boundaries within ministry settings. Issues of professional development are discussed, and students are encouraged to develop strategies for continuing professional, personal, and spiritual growth.
Prerequisites: MF 611. Special Notes: Enrollment limited to students in M.A.M.F.T. Campus: St. Paul.

MF 633 • Counseling Children, Adolescents, and Their Families 3 Credits

Theories and techniques for working with children, adolescents and their families, including evidence-based treatments for commom childhood disorders, assessment approaches, play and child therapy techniques, child abuse assessment reporting and treatment (7 hours of instruction), domestic violence, self-harm, suicide interventions and cultural influences in the realm of parenting.
Prerequisites: MF500. Campus: San Diego.

MF 635 • Individual Development, Aging, Family Life Cycle 3 Credits

Explanation of the different theories of individual development and their effect on relationships. Identification of the transitional issues of individual development across the lifespan. Correlation of a systems understanding of the interaction between biopsychosocial spiritual development of the individual. Explanation of the impact of the transgenerational upbringing and experience on students’ values and assumptions about life transitions and therapy. Assessment of how to work with families. Examination of the legal and ethical issues in MFT.
Prerequisites: MF 625.

MF 641 • Theories of Marriage and Family Therapy 3 Credits

Students review and critique, from theological and theoretical perspectives, major approaches to family therepy, including structural, strategic, transgenerational, experiential, object relations, contextual, systemic, and other emerging models of therapy. Application of techniques from these approaches is practiced in class. Students also examine the place of marriage and family therapy in pastoral care and begin to articulate their own approaches to working with families.
Prerequisites: MF 611. Special Notes: Enrollment limited to students in M.A.M.F.T. Campus: St. Paul.

MF 642 • Couple and Family Assessment 3 Credits

Theoretical perspectives on marital and family assessment are presented, along with an overview of and experience with frequently used personality and relationship assessment tools. This course also introduces the student to the fundamental skills necessary for mental health diagnostic assessment and treatment planning. Students will learn and practice the skills essential to the first three sessions of family treatment. Both medical model and systems integration will be addressed so that students may become bilingual in their ability to negotiate professional relationships with insurance companies, Rule 29 agencies, and other professionals who use a medical model as their primary approach to mental health, while retaining an inherently systemic approach to treatment.
Prerequisites: MF 611. Special Notes: Enrollment limited to students in M.A.M.F.T. Campus: St. Paul.

MF 643 • Advanced Clinical Issues 3 Credits

This course focuses on developing therapeutic and pastoral care strategies based on research, theory, and theological reflection to address issues such as separation and divorce, single-parent and remarried families, infertility, adultery, sexual dysfunction, abuse and violence in the family, and addictive and compulsive behaviors.
Prerequisites: MF 611 and MF 642. Special Notes: Enrollment limited to students in M.A.M.F.T. Campus: St. Paul.

MF 644 • Counseling Couples in Relationship 3 Credits

Theories and techniques for working with couples, including overview of current theories, evidence-based treatment, research on successful marriages and divorce and dynamics of faith, privilege and oppression as related to couples. Assessment and treatment of spousal abuse. Study of sexual dysfunctions and sex therapy.
Prerequisites: MF 625. Campus: San Diego.

MF 645 • Psychological Assessment 3 Credits

This course familiarizes students with the psychometric characteristics and limitations of projective techniques and standardized psychological assessment tools in the context of psychotherapy. Students learn how to administer and score various instruments, interpret assessment data, and write clinical reports that assist in diagnosis and psychotherapeutic treatment. MFT students will focus on relational instruments while MHC students will primarily work with individual assessment tools. Legal, ethical, and cultural issues will receive particular focus, as well as students’ interpretation of their own assessment profiles.
Prerequisites: MF 625 or MH 625, and MF 646. Campus: San Diego

MF 646 • Individual and Family Psychopathology 3 Credits

This course helps students identify individual and relational problems and gain awareness of abnormal and/or unhealthy psychological and relationship functioning. Students will learn how to think critically about the concept of mental disorder informed by the recovery model. The appropriate use of the DSM-5 and its diagnostic categories with diverse populations in various clinical settings will be stressed.
Prerequisites: MF 625 or MH 625, and MF 635. Campus: San Diego

MF 651 • Research Design & Evaluation in Marriage & Family Therapy 3 Credits

Students explore the interpretation and design of qualitative and quantitative research in family issues and in processes and outcomes of marriage and family therapy. Principles of understanding and critiquing published research are examined, with the goal of enabling students to use current literature to ground their therapeutic and pastoral responses to family concerns.
Prerequisites: MF 611. Special Notes: Enrollment limited to students in M.A.M.F.T. Campus: St. Paul.

MF 662 • Clinical Issues in Human Diversity 3 Credits

Self-assessment of knowledge, sensitivity and attitudes toward diverse populations, including race, ethnicity, gender, age, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, spirituality, ability and language. Examination of family structure and social patterns in California's ethnic populations and differences across social class. Experientially examines intentional and unintentional oppression and privilege, promotes social justice advocacy, and develops competencies in addressing biases. Multicultural counseling theories, techniques and mental health service delivery to individuals and family groups struggling with persistent poverty will receive special focus.

MF 670 • Directed Study in Marriage and Family Studies 1-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Special Notes: Permission is required.

MF 675 • Law, Ethics and Professional Issues 3 Credits

Analysis of law and ethics in professional practice, the aspects of ethical and therapeutic relationship, and the differences between legal and ethical perspectives. Formulation of a position on critical ethical and legal professional issues through the use of vignettes. Application of various associations professional codes of ethics to clients. Explanation of the specific legal standards in professional areas. Analysis of the Standards of Practice for Telehealth.
Prerequisites: MF 625.

MF 711 • Supervised Clinical Experience I 3 Credits

MF 711 and MF 712. These two units constitute a nine month practicum including 300 hours of clinical contact and 80 hours of supervision by a licensed marriage and family therapist and/or an AA M.F.T.- approved supervisor. The practicum must conform to the guidelines of the M.F.T. program manual. A continuation fee of $375 is assessed for any semester of participation in group supervision beyond the second S.C.E. unit for M.F.T. students, or for any extension required in certificate programs.
Prerequisites: MF 631 and permission of the director of the M.F.T. program. Campus: St. Paul. Special Notes: Audit unavailable.

MF 712 • Supervised Clinical Experience II 3 Credits

MF 711 and MF 712. These two units constitute a nine month practicum including 300 hours of clinical contact and 80 hours of supervision by a licensed marriage and family therapist and/or an AA M.F.T.- approved supervisor. The practicum must conform to the guidelines of the M.F.T. program manual. A continuation fee of $375 is assessed for any semester of participation in group supervision beyond the second S.C.E. unit for M.F.T. students, or for any extension required in certificate programs.
Prerequisites: MF 631 and permission of the director of the M.F.T. program. Campus: St. Paul. Special Notes: Audit unavailable.

MF 713 • Supervised Clinical Experience Extension 0 Credit

Continued enrollment beyond the last term of Internship registration, required when the internship is incomplete. The extension allows students continued access to university resources. Student must be registered in an extension course at the time the internship is finalized and receives a grade.

MF 715 • MFT Practicum I 3 Credits

MF 715, 716, 717. These three units constitute a 12-month practicum including 500 hours of clinical contact and a minimum of 100 hours of supervision by a qualified California Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, who is an AAMFT approved supervisor and/or a CAMFT Certified Supervisor, and/or other approved supervisor. The practicum fulfills the requirements of the BBS for face-to-face experience counseling individuals, couples, families, or groups. A continuation fee of $357 is assessed for any semester of participation in group supervision beyond the third SCE unit for MFT students.
Prerequisites: MF 625; passing the practicum qualifying exam, and permission of the MFT program administrator. Campus: San Diego Special Notes: Audit unavailable.

MF 716 • MFT Practicum II 3 Credits

MF 715, 716, 717. These three units constitute a 12-month practicum including 500 hours of clinical contact and a minimum of 100 hours of supervision by a qualified California Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, who is an AAMFT approved supervisor and/or a CAMFT Certified Supervisor, and/or other approved supervisor. The practicum fulfills the requirements of the BBS for face-to-face experience counseling individuals, couples, families, or groups. A continuation fee of $357 is assessed for any semester of participation in group supervision beyond the third SCE unit for MFT students.
Prerequisites: MF 625; passing the practicum qualifying exam, and permission of the MFT program administrator. Campus: San Diego Special Notes: Audit unavailable.

MF 717 • MFT Practicum III 3 Credits

MF 715, 716, 717. These three units constitute a 12-month practicum including 500 hours of clinical contact and a minimum of 100 hours of supervision by a qualified California Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, who is an AAMFT approved supervisor and/or a CAMFT Certified Supervisor, and/or other approved supervisor. The practicum fulfills the requirements of the BBS for face-to-face experience counseling individuals, couples, families, or groups. A continuation fee of $357 is assessed for any semester of participation in group supervision beyond the third SCE unit for MFT students.
Prerequisites: MF 625; passing the practicum qualifying exam, and permission of the MFT program administrator. Campus: San Diego. Special Notes: Audit unavailable.

MF 752 • Seminar in Marriage and Family 1.5-3 Credits

An in-depth study of particular marriage and family theme.

MF 780 • Senior Integrative Seminar: Worldview, Ethics, and Practice 3 Credits

This seminar is designed to encourage students to integrate theoretical, theological, and clinical elements into a coherent worldview that will facilitate congruence in professional therapy and ministry practice. Attention will be given to epistemological theories in shaping integrative knowledge; the moral nature of clinical practice, research, and theory; and the value of paradigms of virtue ethics and wisdom for effective ministry to individuals and families.
Prerequisites: MF 611. Campus: St. Paul. Special Notes: Limited to graduating seniors in the M.A.M.F.T. degree program. Audit not available.

MF 785 • Marital and Family Therapy Senior Integrative Seminar 1 Credit

This capstone project is designed to be concurrent with, yet separate from, students' practicum experience. Students' theology (biblical and theological formation), spirituality (personal and spiritual formation as a therapist), and clinical theory with clinical practice (professional formation) are expressed in a culminating master's level project that integrates their academic, interpersonal, and practice experience in the program.

MF 785C • Marital and Family Therapy Senior Integrative Seminar C 0.5 Credits

This capstone project is designed to be concurrent with, yet separate from, students’ supervised clinical experience. Students’ theology (biblical and theological formation), spirituality (personal and spiritual formation as a therapist), and clinical theory with clinical practice (professional formation) are expressed in a culminating master's level project that integrates their academic, interpersonal, and practice experiences in the program.
Prerequisites: Admission to MFT Practicum. Campus: San Diego

MH 625 • Theories of Mental Health Counseling 3 Credits

Students review and critique--from theological, theoretical and cultural perspectives--the major psychological theories. For each theory, students will learn the main concepts, views on human behavior, mental/emotional processes, and psychopathology. Students will be introduced to the theories’ frameworks for intervention in counseling and begin to articulate their own approach to psychotherapy. Campus: San Diego.

MH 626 • Advanced Psychotherapy Theories & Techniques 3 Credits

Students acquire knowledge and skills of advanced psychotherapy theories, evidence-based practices, treatment planning and application of empirically supported therapy intervention strategies. Emphasis is placed on providing professional recovery-oriented psychotherapy services contextualized to diverse populations. Attention will also be given to the integration of clinical theory with issues of faith, exploring the application and relevance of theological concepts to psychotherapy models.
Prerequisites: MH 625, MF 646. Campus: San Diego.

MH 627 • Group Psychotherapy 3 Credits

Major approaches to group therapy are presented with an emphasis on process groups and the use of experiential and didactic strategies. Patterns of communication, common topics, and relevant issues in group dynamics alongside the role and characteristics of effective leaders are explored, coinciding with practice of basic leadership and facilitation skills. Therapy groups are differentiated from self-help, 12-step, care groups, and other group experiences. Students will learn the theoretical underpinnings and practical implications of group dynamics in therapeutic work practices, church fellowships, and other social settings. They will have the unique experience of participating in a therapy group with their peers, as well as practice advanced group therapy leadership and facilitation skills. Participants in this course will be exposed to designing, implementing, and evaluating therapy group programs and interventions contextualized to diverse populations and varying clinical and community settings informed by an understanding of cultural diversity and socio-economic issues.
Prerequisites: MH 625 or MF 625. Campus: San Diego.

MH 636 • Career Development 3 Credits

This course introduces career development theories and service delivery models, examining educational, personal, legal, ethical, and occupational aspects of career development throughout the lifespan. Students will explore employment trends, demographics, and career satisfaction from integrated social science and theological perspectives with applications to culturally and economically diverse populations with varying resources.
Prerequisites: MH 625. Campus: San Diego.

MH 638 • Counseling Children, Adolescents, and Their Families 3 Credits

Theories and techniques for working with children, adolescents and their families, including evidence-based treatments for common childhood disorders, assessment approaches, play and child therapy techniques, child abuse assessment reporting and treatment (7 hours of instruction), domestic violence, self-harm, suicide interventions and cultural influences in the realm of parenting. Campus: San Diego.

MH 645 • Psychobiology and Psychopharmacology 3 Credits

Students are introduced to the biological basis of behavior and psychopathology, and gain a historical perspective of treatment uses of medication for mental disorders within the contexts of biological, social, cultural, gender, and religious issues. Focus is on major classifications of psychotropic drugs, specifying their psychiatric uses, benefits, side effects, toxicities, combinations, and biochemical actions. Students explore how LPCCs can best work with medical and other mental health practitioners to provide a more comprehensive, coordinated, recovery oriented plan of care to clients/patients.
Prerequisites: MH 625, MF 646. Campus: San Diego.

MH 649 • Counseling Couples in Relationship 3 Credits

Theories and techniques for working with couples, including overview of current theories, evidence-based treatment, research on successful marriages and divorce and dynamics of faith, privilege and oppression as related to couples. Assessment and treatment of spousal abuse. Study of sexual dysfunctions and sex therapy.
Prerequisites: MH 625. Campus: San Diego.

MH 655 • Chemical Dependency, Addictions, and Co-Occurring Disorders 3 Credits

Students are exposed to research and theories of ideology, progression, assessment, and treatment models of behavioral addictions, alcoholism, other substance abuse, dependency, and co-occurring disorders. Spiritual, psychosocial, and biological perspectives are integrated, with special emphasis on the effects of chronic poverty.
Prerequisites: MH 625, MF 646. Campus: San Diego.

MH 656 • Crisis Intervention and Trauma Response 3 Credits

Examines theories, legal and ethical issues related to crisis intervention and trauma response practiced in psychotherapy, chaplaincy, and church-based systems. Exploration of the biopsychosocial spiritual and theodicy frameworks for crisis intervention and trauma response. Brief assessments, triage and intervention in crisis incidents such as DV, IPV, suicide, substance abuse, child abuse, elder and dependent abuse will be discussed. Normal transitional and non-normative crises such as loss, grief, terminal illness, accident, and death will be examined. Protocols for response to psychological trauma associated with natural and human-caused disasters. Neuroscience research will inform the assessments and interventions related to mental health disorders such as PTSD and TBI. Strategies will be studied to mitigate the negative impact of trauma on the individual, family system, and the prevention of post-trauma syndromes for primary and secondary trauma victims. Self-care strategies for long-term ministry will be practiced. Government and faith-based resources and referrals will be identified.
Prerequisites: MH 625 or MF 625. Campus: San Diego.

MH 715 • Mental Health Counseling Practicum I 3 Credits

These two courses (MH 715 and MH 716) constitute a nine-month practicum including 350 hours of clinical contact and a minimum of 70 hours of supervision by an approved California licensed LPCC, psychologist, LMFT, LCSW or board certified psychiatrist supervisor. The practicum fulfills the requirements of the BBS for face-to-face experience counseling individuals, families, or groups. A continuation fee of $357 is assessed for any semester of participation in group supervision beyond the second S.C.E. unit for MHC students.
Prerequisites: Approved self-assessment, passing the Practicum Qualifying Exam, and permission of the MHC program director. Campus: San Diego. Special Notes: Audit unavailable.

MH 716 • Mental Health Counseling Practicum II 3 Credits

These two courses (MH 715 and MH 716) constitute a nine-month practicum including 350 hours of clinical contact and a minimum of 70 hours of supervision by an approved California licensed LPCC, psychologist, LMFT, LCSW, or board certified psychiatrist supervisor. The practicum fulfills the requirements of the BBS for face-to-face experience counseling individuals, families, or groups. A continuation fee of $357 is assessed for any semester of participation in group supervision beyond the second S.C.E. unit for MHC students.
Prerequisites: Approved self-assessment, passing the Practicum Qualifying Exam, and permission of the MHC program director. Campus: San Diego. Special Notes: Audit unavailable.

MH 721 • MHC Practicum II Extension 0 Credit

MH 751 • Seminar in Mental Health Counseling 1.5,3 Credits

An in-depth study of particular mental health theme.

MH 785 • Mental Health Counseling Senior Integrative Seminar 1 Credit

This course is designed to be taken concurrently with, yet separate from, students' last term of practicum experience. The seminar supports students writing a master's level capstone project consisting of their theology (biblical and theological formation), spirituality (personal and spiritual formation as a therapist), clinical theory, and clinical practice (professional formation). This MHC Senior Integrative Project integrates students' academic, interpersonal, and practice experiences in the program. Campus: San Diego.

ML 505 • Holistic Discipliship 3 Credits

An investigation into the ways that our spirituality is tied to our emotional, physical, intellectual, and relational health. This class is designed to encourage each student to develop an integrated and holistic understanding of spirituality with special emphasis on what it means to love God with your heart, soul, strength, and mind and to love your neighbor as yourself.

ML 506 • Discipleship in Community 1.5 Credits

This course introduces the biblical and theological foundations underlying approaches to discipleship within a congregational context. The role of Christian community for personal spiritual growth, Christian education, and congregational health is studied. Methods and ministry approaches for accomplishing discipleship in community, for various contexts and in different age groups, will be anlayzed and discussed.

ML 507 • Missional Outreach and Evangelism 1.5 Credits

Demonstration of effective communication of the gospel of Jesus Christ to meet theneeds of the whole person (physical, emotional, intellectual, and spiritual). Evaluation of various non-Christian worldviews while planning ways to articulate the gospel as truly good news. Intentional sensitivity in developing missional strategies to reach people from different religious or cultural backgrounds, as well as across differences related to gender, disability, and economic status.

ML 517 • Christian Social Ethics for the Workplace 3 Credits

A study of the ethical dimensions of Christian theology for leadership and workplace contexts. The class begins with an overview and analysis of ethical theory, terminology, approaches, and biblical bases, and then brings this ethical reflection into conversation with leadership theory and an emerging theology of faith, work, and economics. Application of ethical theory will focus on leadership and workplace issues facing Christian leaders today.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with TS 517.

ML 523 • Introduction to Transformational Leadership: Theory and Practice in Global Perspective 3 Credits

Various leadership theories are explored. A model of transformational leadership theory is presented, with application made to the learner's personal context as well as a diverse range of global contexts. Biblical and "secular" approaches to leadership practice are compared and contrasted and applied to the student's ministry context.
Prerequisites: SP 001 or SP002.

ML 526 • Leading Congregational Worship 1.5 Credits

This course introduces the biblical-theological foundations of Christian worship expressed in diverse public assemblies of the Church. Students will explore their own identity as worshipers of God. The student should come to understand the essence of Christian worship, considering cultural and generational contexts, and grow in one's ability to plan and lead a congregation in worship as the Church develops in the 21st Century.

ML 527 • Leading Worship in the Christian Life Cycle 1.5 Credits

Biblical-theological foundations and practical skills for leading weekly worship and marking special celebration moments in Christian life and community. Analysis of approaches to community worship in ceremonies such as dedication, baptism, communion, weddings, memorials/funerals, and holy days. Integration of theological insight, scriptural guidance, and awareness of personal cultural framework with worship leadership practice.

ML 551 • Mentored Leadership Development (MATL) A 0.75 Credits

This course seeks to align the student with the vision, values, mission and philosophy systems and strategic objectives of the local ministry of which the student is a part. Through the use of psychometric and developmental testing, self-reflection, and mentor and group feedback, the student will identify and progressively clarify life purpose, mission and vision. Based on reflective work, the student will develop goals for spiritual, personal and vocational development, and identify unique personal needs that require intentional focus, in order to develop as a whole and holy leader.
Prerequisites: SP 001.

ML 552 • Mentored Leadership B 0.75 Credits

This course seeks to align the student with the vision, values, mission and philosophy systems and strategic objectives of the local ministry of which the student is a part. Through the use of psychometric and developmental testing, self-reflection, and mentor and group feedback, the student will identify and progressively clarify life purpose, mission and vision. Based on reflective work, the student will develop goals for spiritual, personal and vocational development, and identify unique personal needs that require intentional focus, in order to develop as a whole and holy leader.
Prerequisites: ML 551, TL 001.

ML 576 • Mentored Leadership MAMP 0.75 Credits

The Mentored Leadership Development (MLD) courses are uniquely designed experiences. Each MLD course and sequence of courses is tailored to a particular degree program. The focus of MLD coursework is on facilitating students as they integrate the seminary learning experience into their ministry contexts and walk through specific developmental goals. Through a process of self-examination, developmental assessments, facilitated mentoring, group supervision, and reflection, students demonstrate the capacity for practical application of learning outcomes from the Three Centers learning philosophy.
Prerequisites: SP 001, SP 510 with exception of M.A.T.L.

ML 594 • Mentored Leader Devlp MD ID 0.75 Credits

The Mentored Leadership Development (MLD) courses are uniquely designed experiences. Each MLD course and sequence of courses is tailored to a particular degree program. The focus of MLD coursework is on facilitating students as theyintegrate the seminary learning experience into their ministry contexts and walk through specific developmental goals. Through a process of self-examination, developmental assessments, facilitated mentoring, group supervision, andreflection, students demonstrate the capacity for practical application of learning outcomes from the Three Centers learning philosophy.
Prerequisites: SP 001, SP 510 with exception of M.A.T.L.

ML 595 • Mentored Leadership MDiv 2A 0.75 Credits

The Mentored Leadership Development (MLD) courses are uniquely designed experiences. Each MLD course and sequence of courses is tailored to a particular degree program. The focus of MLD coursework is on facilitating students as they integrate the seminary learning experience into their ministry contexts and walk through specific developmental goals. Through a process of self-examination, developmental assessments, facilitated mentoring, group supervision, and reflection, students demonstrate the capacity for practical application of learning outcomes from the Three Centers learning philosophy.
Prerequisites: SP 001, SP 510 with exception of M.A.T.L.

ML 596 • Mentored Leadership MDiv 2B 0.75 Credits

The Mentored Leadership Development (MLD) courses are uniquely designed experiences. Each MLD course and sequence of courses is tailored to a particular degree program. The focus of MLD coursework is on facilitating students as they integrate the seminary learning experience into their ministry contexts and walk through specific developmental goals. Through a process of self-examination, developmental assessments, facilitated mentoring, group supervision, and reflection, students demonstrate the capacity for practical application of learning outcomes from the Three Centers learning philosophy.
Prerequisites: SP 001, SP 510 with exception of M.A.T.L.

ML 603 • Missional Leadership Development 1.5,3 Credits

This course introduces biblical foundations and strategies to develop leaders in rising generations. It discusses the biblbical purposes of Christian leadership and the church; examines the cultural and generational characteristics of rising leaders; surveys leadership development models used in ministry; and studies practical, multiplicative strategies that would develop rising leaders within an organization. The final project offers students the opportunity to create a simple, yet comprehensive, plan to develop leaders and foster a leadership development culture.

ML 606 • Missional Spirituality 1.5,3 Credits

A study of how to embody the love for God and neighbor from the inside out, the theological foundations and spiritual practices centered in the Great Commandment and what it means to live as incarnational missionaries who love the Lord with all our heart, mind, and strength.

ML 609 • Dynamics of Christian Worship 1.5,3 Credits

A study of the biblical and theological foundations of worship, the nature and meaning of worship, and the many aspects involved in the practice of worship. Consideration is given to worship patterns, structures, forms, rituals, standards, and the planning and leadership of worship.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with SP609.

ML 610 • Communication and Organizational Leadership 1.5,3 Credits

This course is designed to address the essential elements of leadership communication. A model for leadership communication is presented, and students are challenged to process a wide range of material related to the foundations of leadership communication, organizational culture, organizational conflict, and organizational change.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with CP 610.

ML 612YL • Leadership I (Young Life Staff Training) 3 Credits

This course is designed to equip individuals to lead an effective incarnational ministry with young people. Trainers in the field lead students through a curriculum in which action and reflection are emphasized. This course equips people specifically in the areas of spiritual formation, direct ministry with young people, leadership development of volunteers, fundraising, and administration. Emphasis is placed on incarnationally expressing the Gospel of Jesus Christ in the world of adolescents.

ML 613YL • Leadership II (Young Life Staff Training) 3 Credits

This course is designed to equip individual to lead an incarnational youth ministry with effective discipleship of young people. Building volunteer teams for ministry is also an important element of the course. Focus is given to spiritual development of the student, the ministry of discipleship, development of volunteer teams for ministry, fundraising and administration. The role of camping ministry and its implications for discipleship is also emphasized.

ML 615 • Organizational Leadership and Church Governance 1.5,3 Credits

This course is designed to address the role of organizational leaders in congregational and ministry settings. Attention is given to both the pastoral and governance dimensions of leadership, with special focus on relevant strategies and approaches for guiding congregations and ministry communities. This course will focus on the leader's role in working with church staff and board, understanding diverse congregational polities, communicating effectively as a leader, fostering a healthy organizational culture, and navigating conflict and change that may arise in these churches and ministry organizations.

ML 615YL • Supervision and Organizational Leadership (Young Life Staff Trng) 3 Credits

This course focuses on the theory, reflection, and practice of effective supervision in ministry. Students will explore the philosophical foundations for effective organizational leadership as well as practical guidance on such issues as personal leadership style, the emotional intelligence of the leader, team building, conflict resolution, interviewing, placement, delegation, supervision, and evaluation.

ML 620YL • Equipping Leaders Who Volunteer (Young Life Staff Training) 3 Credits

This course will provide students with a biblical/theological and theoretical foundation and the practical experience in equipping leaders who volunteer. The course will focus on recruiting, training, and retaining volunteers within the ministry context of several organizations. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the contextual impact of “age and stage.”.

ML 621YL • The Kingdom of God and Cultural Intelligence (Young Life Staff Training) 3 Credits

This course addresses cultural self-awareness and cross-cultural competence for building healthy relationships within diverse communities. Drawing upon biblical, anthropological, sociological and cross-cultural communication theories, students gain basic tools for researching and interacting among a variety of cultural, ethnic, and religious groups.

ML 627YL • Supervision and Organizational Leadership (Young Life Staff Training) 3 Credits

This course focuses on the theory, reflection, and practice of effective supervision in ministry. Students will explore the philosophical foundations for effective organizational leadership as well as practical guidance on such issues as personal leadership style, the emotional intelligence of the leader, team building, conflict resolution, interviewing, placement, delegation, supervision, and evaluation.

ML 630 • Team Leadership in Global Perspective 1.5,3 Credits

This course examines the biblical purposes and function of leadership through a cross-cultural (or global) understanding of how to first serve and then to lead. Aspects of vision casting, influencing change, and becoming missional leaders who foster the development of effective team ministries will be discussed. Principles and practices required for developing and maintaining high performance, sustainable ministry teams are examined. Special emphasis is given to identifying and discussing the critical knowledge, skills, and abilities required for sustained leadership success in a team-based, entrepreneurial organizational setting. Cases are presented from a wide range of global contexts. The application of intercultural competence is explored.

ML 631 • Leadership Communication in Global Perspective 1.5,3 Credits

This course addresses the essential elements of effective leadership communication in a cross-cultural or global context with attention to understanding cultural contexts and barriers to effective Christian witness. The course will examine the dynamics of the communication process and the ways in which various cultures, audience segments, or value orientations condition the interpretation and communication of the Bible and other messages. A model for leadership communication is presented, and students will be challenged to process a wide range of material related to the foundations of leadership communication, organizational culture, organization conflict, and organizational change. Cases are presented from a wide range of global contexts.

ML 632 • The Global Mission of the Church 1.5,3 Credits

This course includes a biblical and historical overview of the key leadership principles and practices involved in the global diffusion of Christianity. The course draws on insights from a variety of disciplines including the Bible and biblical theology for evangelism, leadership studies, the history of Christian missions, and the social sciences particularly cultural anthropology. Learners are provided opportunity to develop in intercultural competence, to develop a personal philosophy and the theology of missions and evangelism and to formulate a missional approach to ministry appropriate to their particular cultural and situational context.

ML 633 • Stewardship, Change and the Missional Community 1.5,3 Credits

This is a course in applied anthropology and cultural and leadership dynamics with special attention given to how culture change occurs, the dynamics and variables that effect change, and appropriate strategies for the effective change agent, whether an individual or an organization. A biblical theology of stewardship is explored and application made to the work of securing the welfare and progress of a missional community, with an emphasis on dealing with change. A process for gaining feedback on personal leadership performance as well as the collective performance of the community is presented and applied to the learner's context. The course focuses on contemporary areas of social responsibility for Christian advocates and agents of change. Cases are presented from a wide range of global contexts.

ML 634 • Leading and Theologizing in Global Perspective 1.5,3 Credits

This course considers the rationale and models for doing contextual theology (contextual theologizing), and how this impacts and intersects with leadership studies in relation to the development and implementation of contextual models for ministry. The course provides a survey of the leadership models and theological methods and criteria these employ. Selected cases emphasizing the role leaders play in this process are examined.

ML 670 • Directed Study in Ministry Leadership 0.5-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Special Notes: Permission is required.

ML 675 • Presbyterian Polity 1.5,3 Credits

Designed to give students a theological, historical, practical, and pragmatic understanding of how things happen within the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). It also is designed to prepare students to pass the Polity Section that is part of the ordination examination for the ministry of Word and Sacrament.

ML 676 • Reformed Worship and Sacraments 1.5,3 Credits

An introduction to the history, tradition, and structure of Reformed worship. The course answers questions, give practical applications, and considers the meaning and observance of the sacraments.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with HS676 and TS 676.

ML 682 • Missional Innovation (Gateway Church) 3 Credits

For transfer only from Gateway Church. God's heart for every nation, people group, and tribe means His message of faith, love, and hope should be communicated in light of the context. The Apostle Paul seemed to use different methods in the different places he would travel even as his message remained the same. Whether he was in Athens, Berea, Thessalonika, or any other location, Paul strategically communicated the message of Jesus in way that was contextually appropriate. In fact, Paul wrote in 1 Corinthians 9:20-22 the following: "To the Jews I became like a Jew, to win the Jews. To those under the law I became like one under the law (though I myself am not under the law), so as to win those under the law. To those not having the law I became like one not having the law (though I am not free from God’s law but am under Christ’s law), so as to win those not having the law. To the weak I became weak, to win the weak. I have become all things to all people so that by all possible means I might save some.” If we are rejected, we want to be rejected because of the message rather than because of our methods or cultural insensitivity. We all know people who were “persecuted” because of their obvious lack of relational intelligence (and sometimes we have fallen into that trap), but we want to make sure we don’t create any barriers between us and the message of God.

ML 683 • Leading Missional Organizations 1.5,3 Credits

For transfer only from Gateway Church. Ministry remains a marathon rather than a sprint. This course will help you build the character and the foundation necessary to experience long-lasting personal transformation and create a plan for transforming others. Jesus gave us a great example of how to do this. Knowing who He was, where He came from, and where He was going, Jesus chose to serve by washing the disciples feet (John 13:3-4). Along the same lines, you will discover your uniqueness and your calling in order to learn how to serve with character, lead with effectiveness, and walk “in step with the Spirit.”.

ML 685 • Gateway Cultivate Experience (Gateway Church) 9 Credits

For transfer only from Gateway Church. "Cultivate" is a proprietary process, built on software designed for individualized instruction in entrepreneurial contexts, and delivered by Gateway Leaders. It is framed as 60 sequenced learning experiences, which lead students through a learning/application/reflection process integrating 12 key themes. These experiences contribute toward the goal of building successful church plants. It is intended only for the Gateway Leaders Church Planting concentration in the MAMP and MDiv programs.

ML 707 • Change Strategies and Conflict Resolution 1.5,3 Credits

Effective leaders must be prepared to take their ministries through seasons of change, as well as to manage the conflict that inevitably results. Without change, a ministry will become ineffective and irrelevant and will eventually die. If conflict is not resolved, a ministry may leave a trail of wounded people in its wake, or even self-destruct. This course teaches two of the skills most essential for 21st-century ministry leadership. Students learn strategies for bringing about transformational change in their ministry. They also learn how to lead people to greater wholeness and maturity in Christ through a biblical process of conflict resolution.

ML 726 • History and Theology of Ministry 1.5,3 Credits

This course invites the student to a survey of important theological expressions and models in the history of Christian ministries from the first century through the present day. We consider selected themes (WISHMAP), illustrated by classic and contemporary sources, within a chronological framework. The goal is for these “voices” to enlighten and inspire our lives in faithful, fruitful service for Jesus Christ and the kingdom.

ML 730 • Planting Missional Churches 1.5-3 Credits

The study of how to plant and grow missional churches, what it means for a church to have a missional vision, how to determine methodologies appropriate for the context, and case studies of churches that are effective models of missional strategies.

ML 751 • Seminar in Ministry Leadership 1.5-3 Credits

An in-depth study of particular ministry leadership theme.
Prerequisites: ML 523.

ML 780 • Senior Integrative Seminar: Global Leadership in the 21st-Century 1.5 Credits

A summative and integrative reflection on the MATL program is offered. Integrative cases featuring content from each of the Three Centers are used to prompt a collaborative discussion around leadership issues learners are likely to encounter in their immediate context, as well as a wide range of global contexts.

ML 791 • Case Studies in Transformational Leadership 1.5,3 Credits

This course provides students the opportunity for integrative reflection on the biblical foundations, contemporary research, and historical and contemporary practice of transformational, serving leadership. The course focuses on biblical, historical, and contemporary case studies of transformational leadership as it is expressed in a variety of cultural and community contexts.

ML 810 • Personal Well-Being and Ministry Effectiveness 3 Credits

Ministry remains a marathon rather than a sprint. This course will help you build the character and the foundation necessary to experience long-lasting personal transformation, rejuvenation, and create a plan for transforming others. Jesus gave us a great example of how to do this. Knowing who He was, where He came from, and where He was going, Jesus chose to serve by washing the disciples feet (John 13:3-4). Along the same lines, you will discover your identity, core values, calling, and your path towards personal rejuvenation and effectiveness.

ML 810P • Personal Well-Being and Ministry Effectiveness: Project 3 Credits

The successful completion of a series of course-related ministry projects is an important component of the Doctor of Ministry program. Project courses in the Doctor of Ministry program take two forms: (1) projects prescribed by the course instructor that relate to the previous Content Course, or (2) student-designed projects related to the student’s ministry setting. The specific expectations of the course project will be approved by the course instructor during the Content Course prior to the Project Course.
Prerequisites: ML 810.

ML 812 • CL Topics in Ministry Leadership 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement for Church Leadership.
Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

ML 812P • CL Project in Ministry Leadership 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement for Church Leadership.
Prerequisites: ML 812. Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

ML 814 • BTE/CL Topics in Ministry Leadership 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement for either Biblical and Theological Engagement or Church Leadership.
Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE or CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

ML 814P • BTE/CL Project in Ministry Leadership 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement for either Biblical and Theological Engagement or Church Leadership.
Prerequisites: ML 814. Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE or CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

ML 815 • CFC/CL Topics in Ministry Leadership 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement for either Congregation and Family Care or Church Leadership.
Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for CFC or CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

ML 815P • CFC/CL Project in Ministry Leadership 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement for either Congregation and Family Care or Church Leadership.
Prerequisites: ML 815. Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for CFC or CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

ML 826 • The Transformed and Transforming Leader 3 Credits

This course is designed to facilitate personal reflection for transformational ministry leaders. Effective transformational leadership begins with effective self-leadership. While theories associated with self-leadership will be explored in light of general leadership theory, the emphasis of this course will be on the individual student’s reflective journey throughout the course. Because, for better or worse, leaders cast their shadow on many people inside and outside of their organizations, a commitment to personal and spiritual transformation will be a high priority for students in this Doctor of Ministry program and course.

ML 826P • The Transformed and Transforming Leader: Project 3 Credits

The successful completion of a series of course-related ministry projects is an important component of the Doctor of Ministry program. Project courses in the Doctor of Ministry program take two forms: (1) projects prescribed by the course instructor that relate to the previous Content Course, or (2) student-designed projects related to the student’s ministry setting. The specific expectations of the course project will be approved by the course instructor during the Content Course prior to the Project Course.
Prerequisites: ML 826.

ML 827 • Trans Min Ldrsp:Theory & Pract 3 Credits

Focused on providing an introduction to the theory and practice of transformational ministry leadership, this course will expose students to foundational leadership and organizational theories, encourage thoughtful reflection on the nature of studying leadership from a Christian perspective, introduce students to the priorities and expectations of doctoral studies, and challenge students to implement empowering models of leadership in their unique leadership contexts.

ML 827P • Transformational Ministry Leadership Theory and Practice: Project 3 Credits

The successful completion of a series of course-related ministry projects is an important component of the Doctor of Ministry program. Project courses in the Doctor of Ministry program take two forms: (1) projects prescribed by the course instructor that relate to the previous Content Course, or (2) student-designed projects related to the student’s ministry setting. The specific expectations of the course project will be approved by the course instructor during the Content Course prior to the Project Course.
Prerequisites: ML 827.

ML 862 • Topics in Ministry Leadership 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement when paired with the corresponding project course, ML 862P. Concentration topic varies based on scheduling and student interest.

ML 862P • Project in Ministry Leadership 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement.
Prerequisites: ML 862.

ML 870 • Directed Study in Ministry Leadership 1-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Special Notes: Permission is required.

ML 870P • Independent Study in Ministry Leadership, Project 1-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Special Notes: Permission is required.

ML 887P • Ministry Models for Sustainable Community Transformation Project 3 Credits

The successful completion of a series of course-related ministry projects is an important component of the Doctor of Ministry program. Project courses in the Doctor of Ministry program take two forms: (1) projects prescribed by the course instructor that relate to the previous Content Course, or (2) student-designed projects related to the student’s ministry setting. The specific expectations of the course project will be approved by the course instructor during the Content Course prior to the Project Course.

ML 890 • Doctoral Study in Ministry Leadership: 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement when paired with the corresponding project course, ML 890P. Concentration topic varies based on scheduling and student interest.

ML 890P • Doctoral Project in Ministry Leadership 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement.
Prerequisites: ML 890.

ML 923 • Leading Transforming Organizations 3 Credits

Focused on the role of executive leaders in churches and organizations, this course explores the application and impact of transformational leadership at an organizational level. Complementing self, dyadic, and team-oriented leadership theories, a focus on systems thinking at both the organizational and working group levels will be engaged alongside the executive ministry leader’s role in empowering others within the context of organizational leadership. In addition to examining the executive leader’s role in facilitating organizational transformation, the leader’s role of working with boards, working over distance and culture, managing conflict and crucial conversations well, and engaging with effective communication practice will be considered. The course will also introduce students to the priorities and expectations of doctoral studies.

ML 923P • Leading Transforming Organizations: Project 3 Credits

The successful completion of a series of course-related ministry projects is an important component of the Doctor of Ministry program. Project courses in the Doctor of Ministry program take two forms: (1) projects prescribed by the course instructor that relate to the previous Content Course, or (2) student-designed projects related to the student’s ministry setting. The specific expectations of the course project will be approved by the course instructor during the Content Course prior to the Project Course.
Prerequisites: ML 923.

ML 924 • Teams, Grps & the Transfmg Ldr 3 Credits

The course is focused on the art and practice of team leadership. Research and theories associated with effective team leadership will be explored. Special attention will be given to the biblical foundations for decentralized leadership structures, and students will consider the opportunities and challenges associated with teams in contemporary organizations. Factors associated with effective team members will be explored alongside strategies for effective team development and team practice. The course will also introduce students to priorities and expectations of doctoral studies.

ML 924P • Teams, Groups, and the Transforming Leader: Project 3 Credits

The successful completion of a series of course-related ministry projects is an important component of the Doctor of Ministry program. Project courses in the Doctor of Ministry program take two forms: (1) projects prescribed by the course instructor that relate to the previous Content Course, or (2) student-designed projects related to the student’s ministry setting. The specific expectations of the course project will be approved by the course instructor during the Content Course prior to the Project Course.
Prerequisites: ML 924.

ML 925 • Case Studies in Transfm Ldrshp 3 Credits

This course engages students with biblical, historical and contemporary case studies in transformational leadership. Information will be presented and discussed, which is critical to understanding transformational leadership theory, and appreciating the factors that contribute to the exercise of transformational leadership in a variety of settings. The case study method will be employed to listen to, “read” and interpret the lives of individuals who have served and led in a transforming manner. This course is animated by the encouragement given in Hebrews 13:7-8 to reflect on the lives of spiritual leaders. “Remember your leaders, who spoke the word of God to you. Consider the outcome of their way of life and imitate their faith.” The student will learn to glean and value life and leadership lessons from these individuals in order to facilitate his/her spiritual formation, enlarge his/her personal leadership capacity, sharpen his/her philosophy of leadership and consequently grow more effective in the practice of serving, transforming leadership.

ML 925P • Case Studies in Transformational Leadership: Project 3 Credits

The successful completion of a series of course-related ministry projects is an important component of the Doctor of Ministry program. Project courses in the Doctor of Ministry program take two forms: (1) projects prescribed by the course instructor that relate to the previous Content Course, or (2) student-designed projects related to the student’s ministry setting. The specific expectations of the course project will be approved by the course instructor during the Content Course prior to the Project Course.
Prerequisites: ML 925.

NT 508 • Introduction to the New Testament: Scripture and Story 1.5 Credits

A study of New Testament books, focusing on themes, theology, and interpretive methodologies, coupled with consideration of role of the interpreter.
Special Notes: Enrollment limited to M.A.M.F.T. and M.A.M.H.C students.

NT 516 • New Testament Survey: Narratives, Letters, and Revelation 3 Credits

Introduction to the New Testament. Interpretation and synthesis of individual New Testament books using historical, cultural, and theological contexts, including attention to their genres. Summarization of the New Testament’s main theological themes. Recontextualize its message and integrate for personal wholeness and faith praxis.
Prerequisites: BT 510 (may be concurrent).

NT 516YL • Gospels and Acts (Young Life Staff Training) 3 Credits

An introduction and survey of the New Testament Gospels and Acts. The course will examine methodologies for the study of the Gospels (historical-critical and literary approaches), historical and cultural setting, the unique portrait of Jesus and narrative theology of the Gospels and Acts, and an introduction to the study of the historical Jesus.

NT 518 • New Testament: Exegetical Explorations 3 Credits

Analysis of select New Testament books as wholes within their original contexts. Development of exegetical skills including genre analysis, contextual study, and theological reflection and engagement. Discernment of key theological themes that span various New Testament books, with attention to both their unity and diversity.
Prerequisites: BT 510 and NT 516.

NT 541 • Greek I: Beginning Greek 3 Credits

Introduction to biblical interpretation using NT Greek. Translation of Greek texts containing common New Testament Greek words and basic grammatical forms and syntax. Identification of the forms and basic grammatical/syntactical functions of nouns, adjectives and pronouns and the indicative mood of verbs. Definition of common New Testament Greek words.

NT 542 • Greek II: Intermediate Greek 3 Credits

Advancement of biblical interpretation using NT Greek. Translation of Greek texts at an intermediate level of proficiency, attending to a greater range of grammatical/syntactical functions. Introduction to the exegetical tools of textual criticism, diagramming and lexical analysis. Definition of common New Testament Greek words.
Prerequisites: NT 541 or passing of Greek Qualifying Exam.

NT 601 • Matthew 1.5-3 Credits

A concentrated study in the interpretation of the book of Matthew. The meaning of the author will be examined, as well as various critical questions relating to the study of the Gospels.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 602 • Mark 1.5,3 Credits

A concentrated study in the interpretation of the book of Mark. The meaning of the author will be examined, as well as various critical questions relating to the study of the Gospels.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 603 • Luke 1.5,3 Credits

A concentrated study in the interpretation of the book of Luke. The meaning of the author will be examined, as well as various critical questions relating to the study of the Gospels.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 604 • John 1.5,3 Credits

A concentrated study in the interpretation of the book of John. The meaning of the author will be examined, as well as various critical questions relating to the study of the Gospels.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 606 • Romans 1.5,3 Credits

An in-depth analysis of the book of Romans. The central theological themes of the letter will be explored, and there will also be an examination of introductory questions and the relevance of the letter for today's world.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 607 • 1 Corinthians 1.5,3 Credits

An in-depth analysis of 1 Corinthians. The central theological themes of the letter will be explored, and there will also be an examination of introductory questions and the relevance of the letter for today's world.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 608DE • 2 Corinthians 1.5,3 Credits

An in-depth analysis of 2 Corinthians. The central theological themes of the letter will be explored, and there will also be an examination of introductory questions and the relevance of the letter for today's world.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 609 • Galatians 1.5,3 Credits

An in-depth analysis of the book of Galatians. The central theological themes of the letter will be explored, and there will also be an examination of introductory questions and the relevance of the letter for today's world.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 610 • Ephesians 1.5,3 Credits

An in-depth analysis of the book of Ephesians. The central theological themes of the letter will be explored, and there will also be an examination of introductory questions and the relevance of the letter for today's world.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 611 • Philippians 1.5,3 Credits

An in-depth analysis of the book of Philippians. The central theological themes of the letter will be explored, and there will also be an examination of introductory questions and the relevance of the letter for today's world.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 613 • 1 and 2 Thessalonians 1.5,3 Credits

An in-depth analysis of 1 and 2 Thessalonians. The central theological themes of the letter will be explored, and there will also be an examination of introductory questions and the relevance of the letter for today's world.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 615 • Hebrews 1.5,3 Credits

An exegetical study of the book of Hebrews. Attention is devoted to introductory issues, the meaning of the book, its theological contribution, and the message for the contemporary church.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 616 • James and Petrine Letters 1.5,3 Credits

An exegetical study of the book of James and Petrine Letters. Attention is devoted to introductory issues, the meaning of the book, its theological contribution, and the message for the contemporary church.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 640 • Greek Bible Readings 1.5,3 Credits

Involves translating various selections from the Septuagint, New Testament, and early Christian literature.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 652 • Greek Exegesis 1.5,3 Credits

Advancement in ability to perform biblical exegesis and interpretation using NT Greek. Translation of Greek texts with a higher level of proficiency, attending to a greater range of grammatical/syntactical functions. Introduction to the exegetical tools of discourse (logical) and intertextual analysis, and integration of hermeneutical and exegetical tools and contextual analysis.
Prerequisites: NT 542.Three hours.

NT 662 • Advanced Greek Grammar 1.5,3 Credits

An introduction to the science of linguistics; a study of clauses and other large elements in the sentence; a survey of grammatical terms; the use of grammars, lexicons, concordances, and other tools for exegesis; and translation of selected passages from some of the more difficult books of the New Testament.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 670 • Directed Study in New Testament 1-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Prerequisites: BT 510. Special Notes: Permission is required.

NT 697 • Thesis Extension 0 Credit

Extension course for continued enrollment following the term in which NT 795B was taken; required when the thesis course is incomplete. The extension allows students continued access to university resources. Student must be registered in an extension course at the time the dissertation is granted final approval and receives a grade.
$375.

NT 702 • The Parables of Jesus 1.5,3 Credits

The meaning, authenticity, and theology of the parables, as well as the principles and praxis of interpreting parables, are studied.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 705 • New Testament Background 1.5,3 Credits

A study of the Jewish and Greco-Roman historical, religious, and literary background of the New Testament. Emphasis is placed on primary source material.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 709 • The Historical Jesus 1.5,3 Credits

This course is a study of the origin and development of the three quests for the historical Jesus. The critical methodologies of each quest will be studied, along with the various portraits of Jesus proposed by the scholars of these quests. The context for the course is the worshipping community as it encounters Jesus and the renewal of worship that flows from meeting Him.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 712 • The Use of the Old Testament in the New Testament 1.5-3 Credits

An exegetical examination of the ways that the New Testament quotes and alludes to the Old Testament. Methods of interpretation are studied alongside specific biblical passages, with a focus on how to understand the gospel in light of Old Testament foundations.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 716 • New Testament Models of Spiritual Formation 1.5,3 Credits

An exploration of key models of spiritual formation found in the New Testament. This course will seek to combine the best of biblical study skills in the exegesis of several New Testament passages with their proper application to the spiritual formation of one's own life and ministry.
Prerequisites: BT 510. Special Notes: Cognate credit with SP 716.

NT 750 • Seminar in Textual Criticism 1.5,3 Credits

A study of paleography, sources of information about the text (Greek manuscripts, ancient versions, and patristic quotations), history of the text, principles of evaluation of variant readings, and actual evaluation of variant readings.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 751 • Seminar in New Testament 1.5,3 Credits

An in-depth study of a particular New Testament book or theme.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

NT 795A • Thesis Proposal 1.5 Credits

Development of a thesis proposal and prospectus. Survey of existing research and delineation of tentative argument and preliminary bibliography. To be developed in consultation and under supervision of a faculty member as thesis advisor.
Special Notes: Approval of faculty member in relevant discipline is required.

NT 795B • Thesis Writing 3 Credits

Implementation of research plan, under the supervision of thesis advisor and with input from a second reader. To include survey of existing research and thesis that is well argued and supported by the literature.
Prerequisites: 795A.

NT 811 • BTE Topics in New Testament 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement for Biblical Theological Engagement.
Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

NT 811P • BTE Project in New Testament 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement for Biblical Theological Engagement.
Prerequisites: NT 811. Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

NT 814 • BTE/CL Topics in New Testament 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement for either Biblical and Theological Engagement or Church Leadership.
Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE or CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

NT 814P • BTE/CL Project in New Testament 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement for either Biblical and Theological Engagement or Church Leadership.
Prerequisites: TS 814. Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE or CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

NT 862 • Topics in New Testament 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement when paired with the corresponding project course, NT 862P. Concentration topic varies based on scheduling and student interest.

NT 862P • Project in New Testament 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement.
Prerequisites: NT 862.

OT 508 • Introduction to the Old Testament: Scripture and Story 1.5 Credits

A study of Old Testament books, focusing on themes, theology, and interpretive methodologies, coupled with consideration of role of the interpreter.
Special Notes: Enrollment limited to M.A.M.F.T. and M.A.M.H.C students.

OT 516 • Old Testament Survey: Law, Prophets and Writings 3 Credits

An introduction to the Old Testament focused on the message and proper interpretation of OT books, their ancient Near Eastern historical and literary contexts, and theological purposes. Exploration of connections between the Old Testament story and the New Testament. Contextualization of Old Testament messages for Christian ministry contexts today.
Prerequisites:BT 510.

OT 516YL • Old Testament Introduction (Young Life Staff Training) 3 Credits

The course introduces the study of the Old Testament as the Word of God by an exploration of the Writings (Ketubim), the third portion of the Hebrew canon in English translation. This section includes Psalms, Job, Proverbs, the Scrolls (Ruth, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, Lamentations, and Esther), Daniel, Ezra-Nehemiah, and Chronicles. These varied books will be studied from a historical, literary, and theological perspective. Focus will be on original meaning, contemporary significance and the hermeneutical principles that allow us living at the beginning of the twenty-first century to appropriate these ancient books.

OT 518 • Old Testament: Exegetical Explorations 3 Credits

A study of selected texts, themes, and theology of the Old Testament with the goal of developing greater skills in genre analysis, contextual study, and theological reflection and engagement.
Prerequisites: BT 510 and OT 516.

OT 541 • Hebrew I: Beginning Hebrew 3 Credits

A study of the fundamentals of biblical Hebrew with respect to forms (morphology) and simple relationships (syntax). Special emphasis will be placed on preparing the student for the subsequent exegesis of the Old Testament.

OT 542 • Hebrew II: Intermediate Hebrew 3 Credits

A review and expansion of Beginning Hebrew, including morphology, syntax, vocabulary building, and translation, with a goal toward developing a proper exegetical methodology. The course will also include an introduction to textual criticism.
Prerequisites: OT 541.

OT 601 • Exposition of Genesis 1.5,3 Credits

An investigation into the book of Genesis, with special emphasis on the nature and theology of Israel's primeval history and the patriarchal narratives. Emphasis is also placed on the theological and homiletical value of selected texts.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

OT 602 • Exposition of Exodus 1.5,3 Credits

An investigation into Israel's literary traditions of the nation's exodus from Egypt. The focus is on the nature and theology of the deliverance narratives and on the Sinaitic revelation. Emphasis also is placed on the significance of this revelation in Israelite history and theology, as well as its relevance for today.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

OT 603 • Exposition of Deuteronomy 1.5,3 Credits

An investigation into the literary form and theology of the book of Deuteronomy. Emphasis will be placed on the nature of covenant relationship and the significance of the book of Deuteronomy in Israelite and Christian tradition.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

OT 610 • Exposition of the Book of Job 1.5,3 Credits

An investigation into the special literary qualities and message of the book of Job. Emphasis will be placed on the contribution made by this book to a biblical understanding of grief and suffering, and how God's sovereignty, justice, and wisdom are related to human behavior. The pastoral implications of its message for today is explored.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

OT 611 • Exposition of the Book of Psalms 1.5,3 Credits

A study of the prayers for God’s help in times of trouble, hymns of praise to worship God the King, and the nation’s hopes for the coming of the Messianic Son of David.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

OT 613 • Exposition of Isaiah 1.5,3 Credits

A study of Isaiah's call for Judah to trust God, the great King and Savior of the nation. God will judge all proud nations, forgive the people's sin through the death of the suffering servant, and establish His eternal kingdom.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

OT 614 • Exposition of Jeremiah 1.5,3 Credits

A seminar on Jeremiah's doubts about his call, his powerful preaching of judgment and hope, his agony and lamentations concerning repeated threats and persecutions, and his commitment to unveil the deceptive message of the religious leaders of his day.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

OT 616 • Exposition of Daniel 1.5,3 Credits

An analysis of the visions and stories in Daniel to understand how the sovereign rule of God over the world brings hope to Babylonians as well as Israelite exiles who wait for His future kingdom amid persecution.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

OT 620 • Exposition of Micah 1.5,3 Credits

An analysis of the message of the prophet Micah with special emphasis on the methods used to persuade his audience to transform their veiw of reality.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

OT 622 • The Old Testament in Context 1.5,3 Credits

Introduction to the Old Testament in its various ancient Near Eastern contexts:literary, historical, archeological, sociological, religious. Also includes post-Old Testament contexts—Inter-testamental Judaism and New Testament—and consideration of concepts and themes linking the Old and New Testaments. Conducted as a seminar.

OT 652 • Hebrew Exegesis 1.5,3 Credits

Exegesis of select texts from the Hebrew Bible. The primary emphasis will be on translation and syntactical work, with some attention given to text-critical, lexical, and grammatical review.
Prerequisites: BT 510 or BI510, OT 542.

OT 669J • Consortium Course (St J Sem) 1.5,3 Credits

OT 670 • Directed Study in Old Testament 0.5-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Special Notes: Permission is required.

OT 697 • Thesis Extension 0 Credit

Extension course for continued enrollment ; required when the thesis course is incomplete. The extension allows students continued access to university resources. Student must be registered in an extension course at the time the dissertation is granted final approval and receives a grade.
$375.

OT 710 • Historical Geography and Archaeology 1.5,3 Credits

A survey of the time, place and culture in which God's revelation was delivered. Topics include regional aspects of the land of the Bible, the relationship of humans to their environment, the concept of "place" and its effects, and the theological concept of "land." .
Prerequisites: BT 510.

OT 716 • Old Testament Theology 1.5,3 Credits

A discussion of various theological perspectives on such prominent themes in the Old Testament revelation as creation, anthropology, sin, covenant, sacrifice, and law.
Prerequisites: BT 510. Special Notes: Crosslisted with BT 716 and TS716.

OT 751 • Seminar in Old Testament 1.5-3 Credits

An in-depth study of a particular Old Testament book or theme.
Prerequisites: BT 510.

OT 795A • Thesis Proposal 1.5 Credits

Development of a thesis proposal and prospectus. Survey of existing research and delineation of tentative argument and preliminary bibliography. To be developed in consultation and under supervision of a faculty member as thesis advisor.
Special Notes: Approval of faculty member in relevant discipline is required.

OT 795B • Thesis Writing 3 Credits

Implementation of research plan, under the supervision of thesis advisor and with input from a second reader. To include survey of existing research and thesis that is well argued and supported by the literature.
Prerequisites: 795A.

OT 811 • BTE Topics in Old Testament 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement for Biblical Theological Engagement.
Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

OT 811P • BTE Project - Old Testament 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement for Biblical Theological Engagement.
Prerequisites: OT 811. Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

OT 814 • BTE/CL Topics in Old Testament 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement for either Biblical and Theological Engagement or Church Leadership.
Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE or CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

OT 814P • BTE/CL Project in Old Testament 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement for either Biblical and Theological Engagement or Church Leadership.
Prerequisites: OT 814. Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE or CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

OT 862 • Topics in Old Testament 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement when paired with the corresponding project course, OT 862P. Concentration topic varies based on scheduling and student interest.

OT 862P • Project in Old Testament 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement.
Prerequisites: OT 862.

PC 512 • Introduction to Pastoral Care and Counseling 3 Credits

Preparation for effective care of self, others, and the larger society. Evaluation of resources available through faith, science, church and the community to meet the needs of persons, families, and groups, including those with frequently present critical needs. Reflection on both pastoral care and counseling and consideration of the impact that culture and ethnicity have on those relationships.
Prerequisites: SP 510.

PC 563A • Professional Internship A 1 Credit

This course is for Saint Paul students who wish to include CPE experience as part of their professional internship experience. Students participate in a total of 600-hours of ministry service in an accredited ACPE center (400/440-hours) and an approved non-chaplaincy setting (200- hours). Students contract with a CPE site for a supervised experience in a hospital, hospice site, elder care facility, homeless shelter, or affiliated CPE chaplaincy site.
Prerequisites: TL 001, TL 561, PC 512. Special Notes: Supervisory fees are paid directly to the CPE center; this fee is deducted from the Bethel Seminary charges for course credits for PC563A-B. Students complete the required internship hours in a secondary non-chaplaincy setting such as a church or non-profit ministry setting.

PC 563B • Professional Internship B 1 Credit

This course is for Saint Paul students who wish to include CPE experience as part of their professional internship experience. Students participate in a total of 600-hours of ministry service in an accredited ACPE center (400/440-hours) and an approved non-chaplaincy setting (200- hours). Students contract with a CPE site for a supervised experience in a hospital, hospice site, elder care facility, homeless shelter, or affiliated CPE chaplaincy site.
Prerequisites: TL 001, TL 561, PC 512. Special Notes: Supervisory fees are paid directly to the CPE center; this fee is deducted from the Bethel Seminary charges for course credits for PC563A-B. Students complete the required internship hours in a secondary non-chaplaincy setting such as a church or non-profit ministry setting.

PC 566A • Chaplaincy Internship A 1.5 Credits

This course provides students opportunity to intern in the work of chaplaincy. Students complete a unit of Clinical Pastoral Education (a total of 400-440 hours of ministry and reflection) in a CPE center accredited by the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE). Students contract with a CPE site for a supervised experience in a hospital, hospice site, elder care facility, homeless shelter, or other accredited CPE site.
Prerequisites: For MA students, Formation Assessments, Vocational Assessments, SP 510, and PC 512; For MDiv students, Formation Assessments, Vocational Assessments, SP 510, PC 512. CPE site fees are paid directly to the CPE center. These fees are reimbursed to students at the completion of the CPE unit with the submission of a valid invoice or receipt documenting the amount paid to the CPE site. Special Notes: Internship should be taken in the student's final year. Registration by permission of the Director of Supervised Ministry/Internship.

PC 566B • Chaplaincy Internship B 1.5 Credits

This course provides students opportunity to intern in the work of chaplaincy. Students complete a unit of Clinical Pastoral Education (a total of 400-440 hours of ministry and reflection) in a CPE center accredited by the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE). Students contract with a CPE site for a supervised experience in a hospital, hospice site, elder care facility, homeless shelter, or other accredited CPE site.
Prerequisites: For MA and MDiv students, PC 566A. Special Notes: Internship should be taken in the student's final year.

PC 600 • Principles of Counseling 1.5,3 Credits

This course is designed to provide a foundation of basic skills for people who would like to enhance their therapy and pastoral care abilities. It combines theoretical understanding and hands-on practice of essential counseling microskills and can serve as the prerequisite counseling course for people transferring to the M.A.M.F.T. program.

PC 607YL • The Minister as Person (Young Life Staff Training) 3 Credits

This course is designed to equip individual to lead an incarnational youth ministry with effective discipleship of young people. Building volunteer teams for ministry is also an important element of the course. Focus is given to spiritual development of the student, the ministry of discipleship, development of volunteer teams for ministry, fundraising and administration. The role of camping ministry and its implications for discipleship is also emphasized.

PC 611 • Prof Chaplaincy in Contemp Soc 1.5,3 Credits

This course examines the diverse and expanding roles of the professional chaplain in contemporary society. This course is designed to ground students in the theology and basic theories relevant for professional chaplaincy, ultimately equipping students for institutional ministry in light of their own pastoral identity and giftedness. Students will learn essential skills for compassionate pastoral/spiritual care in a variety of ministry contexts, and their understanding of incarnational ministry will be deepened.

PC 632 • Pastoral Care of Children and Families 1.5,3 Credits

This course provides students the theological, theoretical, and practical applications necessary for providing effective pastoral care to children and families. A variety of issues facing children and families are explored. The helping relationship and helping skills are practiced. Emphasis will be placed on the personal and professional self-understanding of the pastor. This course will invite students to process their own family of origin and gain an understanding of family systems and how these elements impact the provision of pastoral care.

PC 652 • Christian Spiritual Life: Henri Nouwen 1.5,3 Credits

A study of major themes in the thought of Henri Nouwen (1932-1996), internationally one of the most influential Christian spiritual writers of our generation. The emphasis is on primary sources, set in the framework of his life and development, and complemented by reflections from the instructor, who served as a teaching fellow with Nouwen during his Harvard years (1983-1985). The goal is for this experience to provide critical insights and personal values that illuminate and encourage our lives as beloved and faithful children of the Lord.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with SP 652 and HS 652.

PC 670 • Directed Study in Pastoral Care and Counseling 1-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Special Notes: Permission is required.

PC 705 • Clinical Pastoral Education 1-3 Credits

Students contract under an accredited CPE center for one unit of CPE, a 400-hour supervised experience, usually in a hospital or nursing care center. CPE is particularly important for persons who plan to enter chaplaincy posts of various kinds, but it is also applicable to many other ministry settings. The credits may be applied as pastoral care electives but may not be applied to professional internship requirements.
Prerequisites: PC 512. CPE site fees are paid directly to the CPE center. These fees are reimbursed to students at the completion of the CPE unit with the submission of a valid invoice or receipt documenting the amount paid to the CPE site. Grade exceptions: This course is Pass/Fail. Special Notes: A passing grade will be assigned when the Office of the Registrar receives, from the student, a notarized copy of the ACPE Certificate of Completion.

PC 710 • Pastoral Care of Youth 1.5,3 Credits

Students with strong interest in youth ministry focus on social, psychological, and spiritual issues of that developmental age group. Includes discussion of youth culture, youth identity crises, drug abuse, rebellion, evangelism, vocational issues, sex education, and parent-child conflict.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with DC 710.

PC 711 • Marriage, Pre-Marriage and Family Counseling 1.5,3 Credits

Gives ministry students an overview of basic principles involved in marriage and family counseling for use in church, not clinical settings. Focuses on short-term counseling methodology.

PC 714 • Developing Spiritually Healthy Families 1.5,3 Credits

In this course, students examine the theological bases for biblical parenting as well as current educational theory concerning effective and dysfunctional parenting behaviors. Since the American culture has become a hostile environment for Christian families, students also are explosed to typical issues that confront Christian parents and, through practical applications, are prepared to promote the emotional and spiritual well being of church families, including their own.

PC 720 • Cross-Cultural Counseling 1.5,3 Credits

Explores the role of the belief system in a variety of cultures from a psycho-social-theological perspective. The processes of self-examination, inquiry, and formulating counseling paradigms are examined to gain insights that can be generalized to other belief systems. Students explore the psychological effects of racism as factors used in counseling of the perpetrator, benefactor, and victim.

PC 723 • Counseling Through the Experience of Grief and Loss 1.5,3 Credits

Students explore their own losses, as well as the literature addressing bereavement, for purposes of counseling and pastoral care. Small group processing, as well as larger class discussion, involve the student in preparation for dealing with this topic on all kinds of levels in church and community.

PC 729 • Chaplaincy in Contemporary Society 1.5,3 Credits

This course examines the diverse and expanding roles of the professional chaplain in contemporary society. It also examines the basic elements of counseling theory, comparing secular and Christian examples of theory and practice. The overall purpose of the course is to ground the student in the theology and basic theories relevant for a professional institutional pastoral care ministry in faith, multi-faith, and/or secular contexts including denominations, hospital/medical care, the armed services, and police and/or fire departments, as well as business and industry.

PC 742 • Ministering to Families 1.5,3 Credits

Sees the modern family as an object of study with the objective of creating prevention-oriented educational ministries in churches. Studies issues such as divorce, crime, sexual issues, unemployment, social mobility, and disintegrating social/family norms and sanctions, and plans ways of educating church attendees in order to help them more successfully manage in today's world.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with DC 742.

PC 745 • Family Systems 1.5,3 Credits

This course discusses basic family dynamics with special emphasis on encouraging students to develop a congruent theological and theoretical perspective on families. Relevant family topics are addressed with opportunities for students to apply theoretical principles to actual family situations, including their own. Special attention is given to a family’s interaction with the institutional church and ways in which pastors can minister more effectively to a broad range of families.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with DC 745.

PC 751 • Seminar in Preaching 1.5,3 Credits

A Masters Degree elective course; an in-depth study of a particular pastoral care theme.

PC 754 • Perspectives on Evil and Suffering 1.5,3 Credits

This course explores two distinct approaches to suffering and evil. Theologians, philosophers, and apologists try to explain why evil exists in a world created by a good God. Pastoral theologians and counselors attempt to help people who are suffering. Course participants attempt integration of the categories, resources, and responses typical of these two areas as they seek answers to the question, "What can theologians and caregivers learn from each other? .
Prerequisites: TS 512 Special Notes: Crosslisted with TS 754 and PH 754.

PC 755 • Family Systems 1.5,3 Credits

This course discusses basic family dynamics with special emphasis on encouraging students to develop a congruent theological and theoretical perspective on families. Relevant family topics are addressed with opportunities for students to apply theoretical principles to actual family situations, including their own. Special attention is given to a family’s interaction with the institutional church and ways in which pastors can minister more effectively to a broad range of families.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with DC 755.

PC 759 • Growing through Small Groups 1.5,3 Credits

Examines the need for small groups within congregational life, strategies for forming groups, leading groups, how they provide the basic needs of pastoral care, and how they become the essential building block for growing a missional church.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with DC 759 and ML759.

PC 815 • CFC/CL Topics in Pastoral Care 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement for either Congregation and Family Care or Church Leadership.
Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for CFC or CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

PC 815P • CFC/CL Project Pastoral Care 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement for either Congregation and Family Care or Church Leadership.
Prerequisites: PC 815. Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for CFC or CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

PC 820 • Understanding and Managing Conflict: A Systems Approach 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement when paired with the corresponding project course, PC 820P. Concentration topic varies based on scheduling and student interest.

PC 820P • Understanding and Managing Conflict: Project 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement.
Prerequisites: PC 820.

PC 862 • Topics in Pastoral Care 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement when paired with the corresponding project course, PC 862P. Concentration topic varies based on scheduling and student interest.

PC 862P • Project in Pastoral Care 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement.
Prerequisites: PC 862.

PC 870 • Directed Study in Pastoral Care 1-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor. Permission is required.

PC 870P • Independent Study in Pastoral Care Project 1-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Special Notes: Permission is required.

PH 606CC • Apologetics 1.5,3 Credits

PH 620 • Methods and Themes in Christian Thought 1.5,3 Credits

An introduction to key concepts, figures themes, and methodological approaches within the history of Christian thought. It involves an overview study of the history of the complex relationship between philosophy and theology from Plato to postmodernism. Key philosophical themes are drawn from metaphysics, ontology, phenomenology, and the question of religious language. Key theological themes are drawn from the doctrines of God, revelation, and the nature of humanity. Methods include historical, philosophical, systematic, and contextual theologies. Special attention is given to points of intersection among these approaches.

PH 655 • Integrative Hermeneutics 1.5,3 Credits

An in-depth look at the human experience of interpretation, through the grid of philosophical hermeneutics and its intersections to theology.
Prerequisites: BT 510 Special Notes: Crosslisted with BT 655.

PH 665 • History of Philosophy of Religion 1.5,3 Credits

This course explores the discourse of philosophical hermeneutics, discussing questions of how we interpret and how language functions in both communication and understanding. It studies significant philosophers and theologians in the field of hermeneutics, and also pays particular attention to the discourses of postmodernism as a philosophical outlook as well as to diverse, marginalized voices regarding their contribution to interpretation of the Bible. The course considers the interpretation of written, sacred texts, but also considers the phenomena of text and “textuality” more broadly, from an integrated theological and philosophical lens.
Prerequisites: TS 512.

PH 670 • Directed Study in Philosophy of Religion 1-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Special Notes: Permission is required.

PH 733 • Theology and Science 1.5-3 Credits

A discussion of the interface between two important modes of knowledge: theology and science. Taking a history and philosophy of science approach, this course evaluates theology and science as two methods for explaining aspects of reality. It discusses whether the results of science have theological import or the axioms of theology may have scientific significance.
Prerequisites: PH606. Special Notes: Crosslisted with TS 733.

PH 751 • Seminar in Philosophy of Relig 1.5,3 Credits

A Masters Degree elective course; an in-depth study of a particular philosophy of religion theme.

PH 754 • Perspectives on Evil and Suffering 1.5,3 Credits

This course explores two distinct approaches to suffering and evil. Theologians, philosophers, and apologists try to explain why evil exists in a world created by a good God. Pastoral theologians and counselors attempt to help people who are suffering. Course participants attempt integration of the categories, resources, and responses typical of these two areas as they seek answers to the question, "What can theologians and caregivers learn from each other? .
Prerequisites: TS 512. Special Notes: Crosslisted with PC 754 and TS 754.

PH 770 • Thesis in Christian Thought 1.5,3 Credits

This is an individual, guided research course which culminates in a master's-level academic paper and a defense of the thesis. Students generally choose the thesis option (rather than the project option) if they intend to pursue an academic vocation in theology or related disciplines and if they intend to further their studies at the doctorate level. Other students may choose this option because they are interested in high-level research at the master's level and if they wish to study a topic in depth. The course is spread out over two semesters, with the first semester designated for the proposal and primary research stage and the final semester designated for research, writing, and defense.
Prerequisites: TS 512.

PH 775 • Project in Christian Thought 1.5,3 Credits

This option is designed for Christian Thought students who want to concentrate on the practical, or “praxis,” application of Christian Thought to ministry (i.e. preaching, church planting, teaching, pastoral counseling, social work, and social justice ministry, etc.). While the student does not write a master's thesis, there is a written component (a summative, reflection paper) to the project option. The primary work, however, is accomplished through a mentored internship experience which is designed in collaboration with the student, the Christian Thought program director, and the Office of Formation, Supervised Ministry, and Placement. The objective is to provide the student an opportunity to apply Christian Thought to a practical arena of ministry related to the student’s vocational interests and goals. The course is split into two semesters, with one credit designated for the proposal and preparation stage and the final two credits for the implementation and written reflection. The course is taken over the final two semesters of a student’s program.
Prerequisites: TS 512.

PH 780 • Senior Integrative Seminar: Missional Apologetics 3 Credits

This course involves the strategic application of theology and Christian thought to the practical tasks of evangelism and mission—with special emphasis on postmodern, pluralist, and post-Christian contexts. It begins from the starting point that successful evangelism and mission today requires a holistic combination of intellectual, social, and spiritual engagement. The course is explicitly integrative, drawing on theology, philosophy, culture studies, leadership, and spiritual formation. Prerequisite: Must be taken in the student’s final year.
Prerequisites: TS 512.

SP 001 • Formation Assessments: Masters Level 0 Credit

Formation assessments are a program requirement for all masters degree seeking students. Formation is an important value at Bethel Seminary. With a focus on self-awareness, Formation Assessments are designed to promote spiritual and personal development.

SP 004 • Formation Assessments: MFT Degree 0 Credit

Formation assessments are a program requirement for all MFT degree seeking students. Formation is an important value at Bethel Seminary. With a focus on self-awareness, Formation Assessments are designed to promote spiritual and personal development.

SP 510 • Introduction to Spiritual and Personal Formation 3 Credits

Demonstration of ability to develop and monitor both individual and communal formation strategies using various biblical, theological, and theoretical perspectives. Consideration of the implications of one’s own personal formation journey in contrast with those on differing formation trajectories, while expressing a non-anxious, reflective, and dialogue-centered approach.
Prerequisites: SP 001 or SP002 or SP003.

SP 520 • Intro to Spir & Pers Form A 1.5 Credits

These two courses (SP 520 and SP 521) introduce students to the process of spiritual and personal formation. Students will explore spiritual theology, models and themes for formation and faith development, and cultural and gender dimensions of formation models and traditions. Students will examine their own spiritual journeys, spiritual disciplines, and relationships with God. Course methodology and praxis include discussion, individual and small group reflections, video and lecture presentations.

SP 521 • Intro to Spir & Pers Form B 1.5 Credits

These two courses (SP 520 and SP 521) introduce students to the process of spiritual and personal formation. Students will explore spiritual theology, models and themes for formation and faith development, and cultural and gender dimensions of formation models and traditions. Students will examine their own spiritual journeys, spiritual disciplines, and relationships with God. Course methodology and praxis include discussion, individual and small group reflections, video and lecture presentations.

SP 525 • Spiritual Formation for the Children's and Family Ministry Leader 3 Credits

This course introduces students to the process of spiritual and personal formation. Students will explore spiritual theology, models and themes for formation and faith development, and cultural and gender dimensions of formation models and traditions. Students will examine their own spiritual journeys, spiritual disciplines, and relationship with God.
Special Notes: This course is restricted to students in the MA in Children's and Family Ministry program.

SP 556 • Spiritual and Personal Formation: Foundations and Traditions I 0.5 Credits

This first-year course introduces students to the process of spiritual and personal formation. Students will explore spiritual theology, models and themes for formation, and faith development and traditions. Students will examine their own spiritual journeys, spiritual disciplines, and relationships with God and others. Students will be encouraged to integrate what they are learning and experiencing at Bethel with who they are as children of God and with their vocational trajectories. Psychological assessment instruments are utilized.
Prerequisites: SP 004. Special Notes: Enrollment limited to students in M.A.M.F.T., or the Post-Graduate Certificate in M.F.T.

SP 557 • Spiritual and Personal Formation: Foundations and Traditions II 0.5 Credits

This first-year course introduces students to the process of spiritual and personal formation. Students will explore spiritual theology, models and themes for formation, and faith development and traditions. Students will examine their own spiritual journeys, spiritual disciplines, and relationships with God and others. Students will be encouraged to integrate what they are learning and experiencing at Bethel with who they are as children of God and with their vocational trajectories. Psychological assessment instruments are utilized.
Prerequisites: SP 004. Special Notes: Enrollment limited to students in M.A.M.F.T., or the Post-Graduate Certificate in M.F.T.

SP 608 • Serenity Prayer: Prayer & Life 1.5,3 Credits

An exploration of The Serenity Prayer, written by Reinhold Neibuhr. Students will examine the content of the prayer, popularized and potential meanings and uses, and reflect on personal and societal invitations the prayer offers. Brief video lectures, small and large group online forums, personal reflection, and interviews are built into the course experience.

SP 610 • Spiritual and Personal Formation II: Relational Spirituality 1.5,3 Credits

Evaluation of one’s personal theology, identity, and wholeness in light of Scripture, Christian tradition, and social science. Self-examination of emotional strengths and limitations, within the context of one’s cultural background and family system. Pursuit of intentional and sustained spiritual growth and integration. Continued exploration of individual, relational, and corporate health and spiritual well-being.
Prerequisites: SP 510.

SP 652 • Christian Spiritual Life: Henri Nouwen 1.5-3 Credits

A study of major themes in the thought of Henri Nouwen (1932-1996), one of the most influential Christian spiritual writers of our generation. The emphasis is on primary sources, set in the framework of his life and development, and complemented by reflections from the instructor, who served as a teaching fellow with Nouwen during the author's Harvard years (1983-1985). The goal is for this experience to provide critical insights and personal values that illuminate and encourage our lives as beloved and faithful children of the Lord.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with HS 652.

SP 656 • Spiritual and Personal Formation: Self in Community I 0.5 Credits

This second-year course invites students to participate in small, facilitated reflection groups that explore topics such as human nature, sin, grace, sanctification, and Christian community. The group reflection process transforms theological doctrines into character-shaping wisdom that, when faithfully acted upon and integrated into students’ lives, leads to greater realization of God’s intention for wholeness and holiness and to deeper integration of theological, theoretical, and experiential truths. Students are challenged to articulate the intersections of their experience with the wisdom of Scripture and the Christian tradition; to demonstrate the ability to use theological reflection to better understand both their own experience and the Christian tradition; and to analyze the impact of theological reflection on their personal integration journeys.
Prerequisites: SP 556, SP 557. Special Notes: Enrollment limited to students in M.A.M.F.T., or the Post-Graduate Certificate in M.F.T.

SP 657 • Spiritual and Personal Formation: Self in Community II 0.5 Credits

This second-year course invites students to participate in small, facilitated reflection groups that explore topics such as human nature, sin, grace, sanctification, and Christian community. The group reflection process transforms theological doctrines into character-shaping wisdom that, when faithfully acted upon and integrated into students’ lives, leads to greater realization of God’s intention for wholeness and holiness and to deeper integration of theological, theoretical, and experiential truths. Students are challenged to articulate the intersections of their experience with the wisdom of Scripture and the Christian tradition; to demonstrate the ability to use theological reflection to better understand both their own experience and the Christian tradition; and to analyze the impact of theological reflection on their personal integration journeys.
Prerequisites: SP 556, SP 557. Special Notes: Enrollment limited to students in M.A.M.F.T., or the Post-Graduate Certificate in M.F.T.

SP 669P • Synoptic Gospels 1.5,3 Credits

SP 670 • Directed Study in Spiritual Formation 1.5,3 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor.
Special Notes: Permission is required.

SP 686 • The Pietist Tradition 1.5,3 Credits

Pietism, "a religion of the heart," signifies a movement launched in the 17th century to reclaim the experiential dimension of Christian faith. This course traces the Pietist impulse in Christian history, evaluates its varied manifestations, and explores the relevance of a biblically-anchored Pietism to the renewal of the contemporary church.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with HS686 and TS 686.

SP 703 • Christian Classics 1.5,3 Credits

An evaluation of important Christian literature, from Augustine's Confessions to C.S. Lewis' Till We Have Faces. Attention will be directed to the context of several types of classics, as well as to their authors and messages.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with HS 703.

SP 716 • New Testament Models of Spiritual Formation 1.5,3 Credits

An exploration of key models of spiritual formation found in the New Testament. This course will seek to combine the best of biblical study skills in the exegesis of several New Testament passages with their proper application to the spiritual formation of one's own life and ministry.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with NT 716.

SP 722 • Coming Home 1.5,3 Credits

Students will integrate contemplative practices and explore ways of being in relationship with God, others, and ourselves that are renewing, wise, and offer us depth as well as renew trust. Join a contemplative container; a safe sanctuary space in which to explore the process of coming home. This course is intended to be experienced as an online retreat.

SP 731DI • Soul Care: Tending to our Heart, Mind and Soul 3 Credits

This course will explore the value of living an integrated life - heart, mind, soul. It will be an examination of living out the great commandment found in Matthew 22 "You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.” Soul care of our heart is about our physical well-being. Soul care of our soul is about our spiritual well-being. Soul care of our mind is about our intellectual well-being. By tending to each one of these area we can live a healthier integrate life - loving God and loving others.

SP 735 • Spiritual Theology 1.5,3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to encourage and stimulate a growing and meaningful life of devotion. Attention is given to the historical and biblical teaching on prayer. Personal sharing and practical experiences of prayer provide a challenge to apply theory to life. Recommended prerequisite: TS 512.

SP 736P • Synoptic Gospels 1.5,3 Credits

SP 749 • Spiritual Direction 1.5,3 Credits

Development of a working definition of spiritual direction and an understanding of the unique characteristics of discipling, mentoring, counseling, and directing relationships. The roles of director and directee, the life of faith and the growth of prayer, the conduct of spiritual direction relationships, and possible benefits and hazards are among the topics considered. Christian educators, pastors, and lay persons respond to the assignments of the course in ways that are suitable for their particular situations.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with DC 749.

SP 752 • Seminar in Spiritual and Personal Formation 1.5-3 Credits

An in-depth study of particular spiritual and personal formation theme.

SP 756 • Spiritual and Personal Formation: Moral and Clinical Integration I 0.5 Credits

This third-year course encourages students to examine the moral and clinical integration of their personal and professional identities. From global and local lenses, students will explore contemporary social challenges such as diversity and racism, human sexuality, economics and poverty, oppression and marginalization, immigration, technological and medical advancements, and additional issues at the discretion of the instructor. Students will be asked to reflect on their personal integration journeys.
Prerequisites: SP 656, SP 657. Special Notes: Enrollment limited to students in M.A.M.F.T., or the Post-Graduate Certificate in M.F.T.

SP 757 • Spiritual and Personal Formation: Moral and Clinical Integration II 0.5 Credits

This third-year course encourages students to examine the moral and clinical integration of their personal and professional identities. From global and local lenses, students will explore contemporary social challenges such as diversity and racism, human sexuality, economics and poverty, oppression and marginalization, immigration, technological and medical advancements, and additional issues at the discretion of the instructor. Students will be asked to reflect on their personal integration journeys.
Prerequisites: SP 656, SP 657. Special Notes: Enrollment limited to students in M.A.M.F.T., or the Post-Graduate Certificate in M.F.T.

SP 815 • CFC/CL Topics in Spiritual Formation 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement for either Congregation and Family Care or Church Leadership.
Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for CFC or CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

SP 815P • CFC/CL Project in Spiritual Formation 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement for either Congregation and Family Care or Church Leadership.
Prerequisites: SP 815. Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for CFC or CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

SP 870 • Directed Study in Spiritual Formation 1-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor. Permission is required.

TL 001 • Vocational Assessments 0 Credit

TL 002 • Vocational Assessments 0 Credit

TL 003 • Vocational Assessments 0 Credit

TL 005 • Doctor of Ministry Assessments 0 Credit

TL 561 • Internship Readiness 1 Credit

This course is designed as a place for students to assess and consolidate the self-examination and discernment work they have done during the seminary journey, processing through interactions with peers and instructors in order to confirm and refine a vocational call.
Prerequisites: TL 001, SP 001, SP 510 (MA and MDiv); PC 512 (MDiv only). Special Notes: Recommended prerequisites for MDiv students: BT 510, CP 510, GC 512, ML 523, and SP 610 (MDiv only).

TL 561DE • Internship Readiness 1 Credit

This course is designed as a place for students to assess and consolidate the self-examination and discernment work they have done during the seminary journey, processing through interactions with peers and instructors in order to confirm and refine a vocational call.
Prerequisites: SP 001, SP 510 (MA and MDiv); PC 512 (MDiv only). Recommended prerequisites: BT 510, CP 510, GC 512, TL523, and SP 610 (MDiv only). Special Notes: St Paul only.

TL 562A • Professional Internship A 1.5 Credits

This course engages the application of ministry skills and pesronal development goals in a context that considers the individual's design for ministry; vocational direction. Accountability relationships, regular reflection, and degree specific outcomes are woven into the practical ministry experiences. Course credit is only granted for internship experiences that have received pre-approval from the Office of Supervised Ministry. Upon completion of the prerequisites, contact the Office of Supervised Ministry to begin the internship process.

TL 562B • Professional Internship B 1.5 Credits

This course engages the application of ministry skills and pesronal development goals in a context that considers the individual's design for ministry; vocational direction. Accountability relationships, regular reflection, and degree specific outcomes are woven into the practical ministry experiences. Course credit is only granted for internship experiences that have received pre-approval from the Office of Supervised Ministry. Upon completion of the prerequisites, contact the Office of Supervised Ministry to begin the internship process.

TL 563A • Professional Internship A 1 Credit

This course engages the application of ministry skills and personal developmental goals in a context that considers the individual’s design for ministry and vocational direction. Accountability relationships, regular reflection, and degree specific outcomes are woven into the practical ministry experiences.
Prerequisites: For MA students, TL 001, SP 001, SP 510; for Master of Divinity students, TL 001, SP 001, SP 510, PC 512. Campus: St Paul. Special Notes: Course credit is only granted for internship experiences that have received preapproval from the Office of Office of Internship and Placement. Upon completion of the prerequisites, contact the Office of Internship and Placement to begin the internship process.

TL 563B • Professional Internship B 1 Credit

This course engages the application of ministry skills and personal developmental goals in a context that considers the individual’s design for ministry and vocational direction. Accountability relationships, regular reflection, and degree specific outcomes are woven into the practical ministry experiences.
Prerequisites: For MA students, TL 001, SP 001, SP 510; for Master of Divinity students, TL 001, SP 001, SP 510, PC 512. Campus: St Paul. Special Notes: Course credit is only granted for internship experiences that have received preapproval from the Office of Internship and Placement. Upon completion of the prerequisites, contact the Office of Internship and Placement to begin the internship process.

TL 564 • Professional Internship Extension 0 Credit

TL 565A • Professional Internship 0.5 Credits

This course supports spiritual, personal, and vocational formation through service in an internship setting related to the student’s intended field of service. Vocational skills are developed and strengthened through learning covenant goals emphasizing biblical and theological foundations, spiritual and personal formation, transformational leadership, intercultural competence, and holistic integration. Training, theological reflection, accountability, and assessment are provided through on-and-off campus interactions with qualified mentors and peers.
Prerequisites: SP 510 and a ministry communications course specified by concentration requirements (MA students); SP 510, CP 510, ML 527 (MDiv students). Special Notes: Course credit is only granted for internship experiences that have received preapproval from the Office of Supervised Ministry. Campus: San Diego.

TL 565B • Professional Internship 1 Credit

This course supports spiritual, personal, and vocational formation through service in an internship setting related to the student’s intended field of service. Vocational skills are developed and strengthened through learning covenant goals emphasizing biblical and theological foundations, spiritual and personal formation, transformational leadership, intercultural competence, and holistic integration. Training, theological reflection, accountability, and assessment are provided through on-and-off campus interactions with qualified mentors and peers.
Prerequisites: TL 565A. Campus: San Diego.

TL 565C • Professional Internship 0.5 Credits

This course supports spiritual, personal, and vocational formation through service in an internship setting related to the student’s intended field of service. Vocational skills are developed and strengthened through learning covenant goals emphasizing biblical and theological foundations, spiritual and personal formation, transformational leadership, intercultural competence, and holistic integration. Training, theological reflection, accountability, and assessment are provided through on-and-off campus interactions with qualified mentors and peers.
Prerequisites: TL 565A and TL 565B. Campus: San Diego.

TL 565D • Professional Internship 1 Credit

This course supports spiritual, personal, and vocational formation through service in an internship setting related to the student’s intended field of service. Vocational skills are developed and strengthened through learning covenant goals emphasizing biblical and theological foundations, spiritual and personal formation, transformational leadership, intercultural competence, and holistic integration. Training, theological reflection, accountability, and assessment are provided through on-and-off campus interactions with qualified mentors and peers.
Prerequisites: TL 565A, TL 565B and TL 565C. Campus: San Diego.

TL 566A • Professional Internship for MDiv A 1.5 Credits

Spiritual, personal and vocational formation through goal setting based on degree outcomes and in a context that considers the individual’s design for ministry and vocational direction. Participation in ministry in an approved vocational setting. Development of core capacities for spiritual leadership through action reflection.
Prerequisites: SP 001, TL 001, SP 510, CP 510, ML 527, PC 512. Special Notes: Internship should be taken in the student's final year. Registration by permission of the Director of Supervised Ministry/Internship. Course credit is only granted for internship experiences that have received pre-approval from the Director of Supervised Ministry/Internship. 400 hours are required between TL 566A and TL 566B. This course is intended for MDiv students. The corresponding MA Ministry internship course is TL 568A.

TL 566B • Professional Internship for MDiv B 1.5 Credits

Spiritual, personal and vocational formation through goal setting based on degree outcomes and in a context that considers the individual’s design for ministry and vocational direction. Participation in ministry in an approved vocational setting. Development of core capacities for spiritual leadership through action reflection.
Prerequisites: TL 566A. Special Notes: Internship should be taken in the student's final year. Registration by permission of the Director of Supervised Ministry/Internship. Course credit is only granted for internship experiences that have received preapproval from the Director of Supervised Ministry/Internship. This course is intended for MDiv students. The corresponding MA Ministry internship course is TL 568B.

TL 568A • Professional Internship for MA in Ministry A 1.5 Credits

Spiritual, personal and vocational formation through goal setting based on degree outcomes and in a context that considers the individual’s design for ministry and vocational direction. Participation in ministry in an approved vocational setting. Development of core capacities for spiritual leadership through action reflection.
Prerequisites: SP 001, TL 001, SP 510. Special Notes: Internship should be taken in the student's final year. Registration by permission of the Director of Supervised Ministry/Internship. Course credit is only granted for internship experiences that have received pre-approval from the Director of Supervised Ministry/Internship. 400 hours are required between TL 568A and TL 568B. This course is intended for MA Ministry students. The corresponding MDiv internship course is TL 566A.

TL 568B • Professional Internship for MA in Ministry B 1.5 Credits

Spiritual, personal and vocational formation through goal setting based on degree outcomes and in a context that considers the individual’s design for ministry and vocational direction. Participation in ministry in an approved vocational setting. Development of core capacities for spiritual leadership through action reflection.
Prerequisites: TL 568A. Special Notes: Internship should be taken in the student's final year. Registration by permission of the Director of Supervised Ministry/Internship. Course credit is only granted for internship experiences that have received preapproval from the Director of Supervised Ministry/Internship. This course is intended for MA Ministry students. The corresponding MDiv internship course is TL 566A.

TL 670 • Directed Study in Transformational Leadership 1-9 Credits

Research and study by arrangement with the professor. Permission is required.

TL 752 • Seminar in Transformational Leadership 1.5-3 Credits

An in-depth study of a particular transformational leadership theme.

TS 512 • Systematic Theology I: God the Creator 3 Credits

Investigation into the nature of God in His Triune life and His self-revelation through the Scriptures. Study of the nature of humanity in its created and fallen condition. Evaluation of one’s personal theology, in light of historical Christianity and emerging theologies. Contextualization of the gospel and integration of key learnings into one’s faith.

TS 512CC • Humanity Christ Salvation Campus Crusade School of Leadership 1 Credit

A discussion of the integrative nature and methods of systematic theolgy; a study of the character of God's self-disclosure in nature and the Bible; an investigation of the being and foundational works of the Triune God; and an analysis of human nature both as it was created by God and as it exists in its present sinful state.

TS 512YL • Systematic Theology I: Theology and Anthropology (Young Life Staff Training) 3 Credits

This course is specially designed to introduce Young Life staff to the discipline of theology. Its goal is to help students cultivate their capacity to think Christianly, particularly as this relates to the topics of (1) theological method, (2) God and revelation, (3) creation and humankind, and (4) sin. Each student will be encouraged to develop his/her own theological framework, testing its adequacy by Scripture and in dialogue with Christian tradition, the church (including the community of Young Life), personal experience, and contemporary culture.

TS 513 • Systematic Theology II: God the Redeemer 3 Credits

Investigation of the person of Jesus Christ and the provision of salvation through Christ for humanity. Study of the Holy Spirit’s person and redemptive and reconciling work and God’s plan for the future of all creation. Evaluation of one’s personal theology, in light of historical Christianity and emerging theologies. Contextualization of the gospel and integration of key learnings into one’s faith.

TS 516 • Christian Social Ethics 3 Credits

Exploration of the ethical vision of the Christian faith, grounded upon God’s character and revealed will, and aimed toward moral transformation of persons and society. Integration of ethical theory, methods, biblical interpretation, spiritual resources, and the distinct motivation supporting Christian ethical concern. Demonstration of how a Christian ethical vision shapes identity and personal holiness and leads to service to the community and church. Evaluation of personal and cultural frameworks in ethical decision-making.
Prerequisites: TS 512, TS 513.

TS 517 • Christian Social Ethics for the Workplace 3 Credits

A study of the ethical dimensions of Christian theology for leadership and workplace contexts. The class begins with an overview and analysis of ethical theory, terminology, approaches, and biblical bases, and then brings this ethical reflection into conversation with leadership theory and an emerging theology of faith, work, and economics. Application of ethical theory will focus on leadership and workplace issues facing Christian leaders today.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with ML 517.

TS 520 • Theology & Psychological Theory: An Integrative Seminar 3 Credits

This course is an investigation of selected doctrines from theological and psychological perspectives. Team-taught by a theology professor and a MFT/MHC professor, it is designed to facilitate faith-therapy integration in the domains of theory, professional practice, and personal formation.
Prerequisites: MF 625 or MH 625.

TS 530 • Faith and Public Life 3 Credits

An introduction to the public nature of Christian belief and practice, highlighting diverse expressions of faith-culture interaction. Different types and facets of culture engagement are defined and explored, including intercultural, interdisciplinary, interreligious, ethical, and apologetic concerns. Cultural agency is connected to theological reflection, spiritual formation, and vocational leadership.

TS 531 • Theol of Salvation & Atonement 3 Credits

This course is an exploration into the variety of Christian expressions of soteriology, understood both historically and contextually. Historically, various approaches to and developments within notable theologies of salvation and atonement are highlighted from major periods, including the patristic, medieval, Reformation, modern, and postmodern era. Contextually, contemporary approaches and debates are considered.

TS 601 • History of Christian Thought: The Early Church to Scholasticism 1.5,3 Credits

A survey of the major historical, cultural, and theological factors influencing the development of doctrine to Aquinas, with major analysis of the work of the Ante- and Post-Nicene councils and their subsequent influence on the articulation of the structure of theological thought.
Prerequisites: HS 510. Special Notes: Crosslisted with HS 601.

TS 602 • History of Christian Thought: Scholasticism to Enlightenment 1.5,3 Credits

An analysis of theological renewal based on an inductive study from the writings of Wycliffe, Hus, Luther, Calvin, the Anabaptists, Elizabethan-American Puritans, and John Wesley.
Prerequisites: HS 510. Special Notes: Crosslisted with HS 602.

TS 603 • History of Christian Thought: 19th Century to the Present 1.5,3 Credits

An analysis of the antecedents of contemporary theology as reflected in the formative periods of the 19th century to the present, with particular reference to the modern era and its significance in contemporary church life.
Prerequisites: HS 510. Special Notes: Crosslisted with HS 603.

TS 605 • Theology and Contemporary Culture 1.5,3 Credits

An engagement with current, popular forms of cultural expression - movies, music, television, sports, social media, etc. - and their relevance to Christian thought and practice. This course emphasizes cultural hermeneutics: how interpretations of culture can shape and inform theological reflection, public action, vocational identity, and missional engagement.

TS 630 • Eschatology and Hope 1.5,3 Credits

This course explores the themes of eschatology, or the doctrine of the “last things,” with particular attention to the ways in which it contributes hope for humanity and for the purpose of creation. While engaging the thought of major contemporary theologians, this course focuses on the relation between eschatology and Christology, soteriology, and political and practical/pastoral theology. Attention is also given to the relation between eschatology and theodicy, Christian spirituality and ecological ethics.
Prerequisites: TS 512.

TS 632 • World Religions 1.5,3 Credits

This couse is a study of the world religions that provide structures of belief and meaning for vast numbers of people in America and globally. A primary goal is to develop the understanding and sensitivities necessary to represent Christ attractively, and communicate His Gospel intelligibly, to adherents of these faiths. It is also an opportunity to develop an informed Christian theology of religions.
Prerequisites: recommended to have taken TS 512. Special Notes: Crosslisted with GC 632.

TS 633 • The Church and Social Issues 1.5,3 Credits

An in-depth study of contemporary social challenges and questions, particularly in North American society, but with a view to the reality of globalization. The guiding question is: How does Scripture and the Gospel apply to the most difficult and pressing issues of the day and how can the church be involved? Particular issues are at the discretion of the instructor, but they will likely include (though not be limited to): diversity and racism, human sexuality, economics and poverty, and food and agriculture.
Prerequisites: TS 512.

TS 634 • Religious Pluralism 1.5,3 Credits

This course explores the theological issue of religious pluralism from a Christian and evangelical perspective. Students explore the historical and contemporary expressions of pluralism as represented by such thinkers as John Hick, John Cobb, and Raimundo Panikkar, among others. Special attention is given to Christological questions posed by pluralism and appropriate theological and apologetic responses. Practical and constructive methodologies are incorporated.
Prerequisites: TS 512.

TS 635 • World Religions 1.5,3 Credits

A study of world religions (including Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and Hispanic Catholicism) that provide structures of belief and meaning for vast numbers of people in America and globally. The goal is to develop understandings and sensitivity that will enable students to represent Christ more attractively, and communicate His gospel more intelligibly, to adherents of these faiths.
Prerequisites: TS 512 (recommended).

TS 640 • Biblical Justice 1.5,3 Credits

A focused examination of a biblically-informed view of justice and action-oriented responsibility. Attention is given to theological hermeneutics, in conversation with the sciences. Special consideration is given to race, gender, class, and other issues of contemporary significance. Active justice is explored in relation to spiritual formation in cultural, ecclesial, and vocational contexts.

TS 653 • John Calvin: International Reformer 1.5,3 Credits

This course analyzes and evaluates the mature theology of John Calvin as presented in the 1559 edition of the Institutes of the Christian Religion.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with HS 653.

TS 661 • C. S. Lewis 1.5,3 Credits

TS 662 • Kierkegaard and Postmodernity 1.5,3 Credits

This course explores the philosophical and theological thought of Soren Kierkegaard, a 19th century Danish author who has influenced deeply postmodern thinking. Scholarship on Kierkegaard has exploded in the last few decades and a new sensitivity to his contribution to Christian theology has emerged. We explore the basic structure and themes of his authorship by engaging and analyzing selected primary texts. What are the implications of his work for evangelical Christian faith in contemporary culture? .
Prerequisites: TS 512.

TS 670 • Directed Study in Theology 1-9 Credits

Research focused on a particular theological issue or topic may be pursued under independent arrangement with the professor involved.
Prerequisites: TS 512. Special Notes: Permission is required.

TS 672 • Baptist History and Theology 1.5,3 Credits

This course surveys the history, theological convictions and distinctive practices of the Baptist tradition. Contemporary developments, special challenges and promising opportunities will receive focused attention.
Prerequisites: TS 512. Special Notes: Cognate Credit with HS672.

TS 675 • Creeds & Confessions of the Reformed Church 1.5,3 Credits

An exploration of the theology of the Reformed tradition through the study of nine creeds and confessions. The course also discusses how the pressure of church heresies and conflicts, as well as national pressures, brought together some of the most important theological statements the church has produced. In addition, the course explores the theological expressions surrounding the doctrines of the person and nature of Christ, the sacraments, election, the Bible and its interpretation, the church, and the relationship of church and state. This course is one of three offered in San Diego that are required by the local Presbytery for ordination in the PCUSA.
Prerequisites: TS 512. Special Notes: Crosslisted with HS 675.

TS 676 • Reformed Worship and Sacraments 1.5,3 Credits

An introduction to the history, tradition, and structure of Reformed worship. The course answers questions, gives practical applications, and considers the meaning and observance of the sacraments.
Prerequisites: TS 512. Special Notes: Crosslisted with HS676 and ML 676.

TS 686 • The Pietist Tradition 1.5,3 Credits

Pietism, "a religion of the heart," signifies a movement launched in the 17th century to reclaim the experiential dimension of Christian faith. This course traces the Pietist impulse in Christian history, evaluates its varied manifestations, and explores the relevance of a biblically-anchored Pietism to the renewal of the contemporary church.
Prerequisites: TS 512. Special Notes: Crosslisted with HS686 and SP 686.

TS 697 • Thesis Extension 0 Credit

Extension course for continued enrollment ; required when the thesis course is incomplete. The extension allows students continued access to university resources. Student must be registered in an extension course at the time the dissertation is granted final approval and receives a grade.
$375.

TS 704 • Movie Theology 1.5,3 Credits

A structured workshop in theological evaluation of the heart and mind of contemporary culture as reflected in significant motion pictures. Particular attention is paid to portrayals of the human condition and to religious themes. The goal of the course is to cultivate the art of listening and watching perceptively, with a view to learning whenever possible, and to affirmation or criticism as appropriate.
Prerequisites: TS 512.

TS 707 • Existentialism in Theology 1.5,3 Credits

This course introduces key themes and figures in existentialism, with special focus on existentialist theologians and philosophers who have deeply influenced an existential approach to theology (as well as the intersection of theology and psychology). Themes include the nature and meaning of existence, the phenomena of religious faith and doubt, problems of alienation, and courage in suffering and the confrontation with death. The course also considers existentialist ethics (de Beauvoir and Sartre) and the impact of terror management theory on theological ethics and church practice. Other key figures include, but go beyond, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Tillich, and Ernest Becker.
Prerequisites: TS 512.

TS 726 • History and Theology of Ministry 1.5,3 Credits

This course invites the student to a survey of important theological expressions and models in the history of Christian ministries from the first century through the present day. We consider selected themes (WISHMAP), illustrated by classic and contemporary sources, within a chronological framework. The goal is for these “voices” to enlighten and inspire our lives in faithful, fruitful service for Jesus Christ and the Kingdom.
Prerequisites: TS 512. Special Notes: Crosslisted with ML 726 and HS 726.

TS 733 • Theology and Science 1.5-3 Credits

A discussion of the interface between two important models of knowledge: theology and science. Taking a history and philosophy of science approach, this course evaluates theology and science as two methods for explaining aspects of reality. It discusses whether the results of science have theological import or the axioms of theology may have scientific significance.
Special Notes: Crosslisted with PH 733.

TS 735 • Spiritual Theology 1.5,3 Credits

This course clarifies the nature of Christian spirituality, makes a case for studying it, examines its biblical, doctrinal and psychological foundations, and then, finally, explores its three Spirit-directed dynamics of relating (to God, others and creation), becoming (holy and whole), and doing (finding our place in the larger purposes of God). Practical assignments and directed experiences provide opportunities to move beyond theory to personal formation.
Prerequisites: TS 512 (recommended).

TS 739 • Theology in a Global Context 1.5,3 Credits

This course addresses key intersections between theology and culture and explores questions and issues related to contextuality in theologizing. It does so by close readings, discussions, and analysis of contemporary theologies coming from beyond the traditional Euro-American context, including African, Asian, Latin American and other non-Western contexts. Themes of focus include Christology, anthropology, and the doctrine of salvation.
Prerequisites: TS 512. Special Notes: Crosslisted with GC 739.

TS 742 • Sexual Ethics 1.5,3 Credits

A study of human sexual character and sexual expression from the perspectives of Scripture, theology, history, and contemporary thought and practice. Focuses on prevalent misunderstandings and abuses of sexuality, as well as the goodness of sexuality as designed by our Creator, in the lives of both married and single persons. Fornication, adultery, pornography, homosexuality, solo sex, celibacy, marriage, divorce, and remarriage are some of the topics we examine to learn how we may live godly and satisfying lives in an increasingly perverse society.
Prerequisites: TS 512.

TS 751 • Seminar in Theology 1.5-3 Credits

An in-depth study of a particular contemporary theological issue.
Prerequisites: TS 512 and TS 513.

TS 752 • Seminar in Ethics 1.5,3 Credits

The seminar provides opportunity for skill development in Christian ethics methodology through advanced-level study of a particular ethical issue. Seminar topics are chosen on the basis of contemporary relevance and significance.
Prerequisites: TS 512, TS 516.

TS 754 • Perspectives on Evil and Suffering 1.5,3 Credits

This course explores two distinct approaches to suffering and evil. Theologians, philosophers, and apologists try to explain why evil exists in a world created by a good God. Pastoral theologians and counselors attempt to help people who are suffering. Course participants attempt integration of the categories, resources, and responses typical of these two areas as they seek answers to the question, "What can theologians and caregivers learn from each other? .
Prerequisites: TS 512. Special Notes: Crosslisted with PC 754 and PH 754.

TS 774 • Theology of Leadership and Vocation 1.5,3 Credits

This course will enable students to articulate a theology of leadership in an increasingly post-Christendom context and will also explore the nature of vocation as understood historically and in the present. The course explores the theological nature and biblical rationale for effective leadership and also explores, more broadly, vocation as a gift and responsibility, but does so in the context of reflection on the nature of the kingdom of God. The course culminates in in-depth communal and personal reflection on the question of vocation.
Prerequisites: TS 512. Special Notes: Crosslisted with ML774.

TS 775 • Theo of Leadership/Voc A 1.5,3 Credits

This is a theology/leadership/vocation integrative course designed for CT students, but cross-listed as ML. Ideally it will be co-taught between a BTF instructor and CTL instructor. The course will articulate a theology of leadership in an increasingly post-Christendom context and will also explore the nature of vocation as understood histroically and in the present.

TS 776 • Theo of Leadership/Voc B 1.5,3 Credits

This is a theology/leadership/vocation integrative course designed for CT students, but cross-listed as ML. Ideally it will be co-taught between a BTF instructor and CTL instructor. The course will articulate a theology of leadership in an increasingly post-Christendom context and will also explore the nature of vocation as understood histroically and in the present.

TS 780 • MA(TS) Capstone Course 3 Credits

This course aims at integration of the curricular content of the M.A. (T.S.) program with a view to preparing students as they look ahead to future ministries of teaching and, for those who continue on academically, vocational scholarship. The course will incorporate insights from leadership studies that apply to students on these tracks. It will also sensitize students to the cultural dynamics of their anticipated ministry contexts and provide a framework for developing a general theology of culture and cultural agency. The capstone course may be organized around a particular theme or study topic each year.
Prerequisites: TS 512.

TS 781 • Faith and Vocation 1.5,3 Credits

Capstone course where students are given an opportunity to practice culture engagement from a Christian perspective by applying biblical, theological, historical, ethical, cultural, scientific, and other insights to specific concerns driven by context. Emphasis is placed on the holistic integration of faith, culture, vocation, and spiritual formation as a means of faithful leadership, service, and stewardship. This course must be taken in the final year of study.

TS 795A • Thesis Proposal 1.5 Credits

Development of a thesis proposal and prospectus. Survey of existing research and delineation of tentative argument and preliminary bibliography. To be developed in consultation and under supervision of a faculty member as thesis advisor.
Special Notes: Approval of faculty member in relevant discipline is required.

TS 795B • Thesis Writing 3 Credits

Implementation of research plan, under the supervision of thesis advisor and with input from a second reader. To include survey of existing research and thesis that is well argued and supported by the literature.
Prerequisites: TS 795A.

TS 811 • BTE Project in Theological Studies 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement for Biblical Theological Engagement.
Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

TS 811P • BTE Project - Theo. Studies 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement for Biblical Theological Engagement.
Prerequisites: TS 811. Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

TS 814 • BTE/CL Topics in Theological Studies 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement for either Biblical and Theological Engagement or Church Leadership.
Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE or CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

TS 814P • BTE/CL Project in Theological Studies 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement for either Biblical and Theological Engagement or Church Leadership.
Prerequisites: TS 814. Special Notes: This course will fulfill concentration requirements for BTE or CL concentration students or an elective requirement for other concentrations.

TS 860 • Topics in Theological Studies 3 Credits

Concentration content course to fulfill DMin requirement when paired with the corresponding project course, TS 860P. Concentration topic varies based on scheduling and student interest.

TS 860P • Project in Theological Studies 3 Credits

Concentration project course to fulfill DMin requirement.
Prerequisites: TS 860.

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